MSH survey #3

The MSH-MPC has issued its third survey per the weekly email below.  It is really encouraging that a substantial portion of the town has weighed in via the first two surveys (1,073 and 1,084 responses respectively), and from memory only 43% of the second set of respondents had participated in the first survey, so that about 1,500 residents have weighed in to date.

I read many of the comments shared in those surveys, and my concerns were raised over the disparate extent of the ideas expressed, and how the town would now move from the wide funnel of ideas that have been shared to the much narrower plans for any reuse, while getting true public agreement and consensus about what we, as a town, want to happen at the former MSH site.

My thinking about the site has moved from a focus on the possible real estate development to my main focus now being on how the town makes whatever we do there the most interesting for the current residents of Medfield.  I am not so much interested in the development itself for its own sake now, as I am in creating something that the rest of us in town will see as being interesting enough that the site will become a destination for us to seek out and to use.  However, i do think of some real estate developments being interesting, so I do hope we get a dense village like result (no subdivisions) that provides that sort of interest.  And I now think of the real estate development as being the economic engine that will allow us to do the things that will make the site interesting for the rest of the residents in town.

With regard to the “interesting” metric this week I have been looking at the possible cultural and arts opportunities for Medfield, with the Hopkinton Center for the Arts and its feasibility study (arts and culture can be economic engines and creators for municipalities) as examples of what is possible.  Integrating arts, culture, recreation, or education throughout the site might well be ways that would make the site interesting to the rest of Medfield residents.  To get better data on this for the MSH site, we would need to spend about $10,000 for a consultant study.  Hopkinton parlayed its study into a $450,000 fund raising for its facility.

Lee Chapel


Medfield State Hospital Master Plan Committee Update

Survey #3 is ready! This will be the last survey of the summer – prior to our public meeting on September 16th. The primary goal of the surveys is to broaden the number of people who are providing the committee with their insights and preferences regarding the use of the state hospital and adjacent town properties.

 

 

Photo from July 22nd walking tour of the campus courtesy of Teresa James

 

What is Your Vision?

Specifically the purpose of these surveys is to:

  • Ensure that a broad range of ideas are considered
  • Provide opportunity for public input from individuals unable to attend public meetings
  • Provide opportunity to gather input from residents in neighboring towns.
  • Understand community preferences for various uses in shaping alternatives for consideration in a public meeting on September 16th

The surveys are intended to be short and easy to complete. Survey #3 intends to query the public around statements from additional use categories heard from Survey #1. The question format was intentionally kept the same where respondents choose from Strongly Disagree to Strongly Agree with a variety of statements. Those who complete the survey will be able to see how their answers compare to the other respondents……so it should be interesting.

Share the link with your friends, family and neighbors. The second survey will remain open through September 3, 2015.

We thank everyone who participates for taking a few minutes of your time to make your voice heard.

SURVEY #3 LINK:  Click HERE to take the survey.

Walking Tour Available! John Thompson has generously agreed to host another walking tour of the MSH property on Sunday, September 13, 2015 at 4:00pm and should last until approximately 5:30pm. Meet at the main entrance by the security trailers. Parking is available across the street from the property on the top of the sledding hill (Hospital Road).

 

To sign up for our weekly email blasts, get more information,or schedule a MSHMPC representative to speak with your Club or Organization please contact Sarah Raposa, Medfield Town Planner at sraposa@medfield.net

Planning Board vacancy

Medfield Planning Board Vacancy

The Town of Medfield Planning Board is seeking to fill a vacant Associate Member position.  Anyone who may be interested should submit a letter of interest to Evelyn Clarke at eclarke@medfield.net in the Board of Selectmen’s office by October 1, 2015.  For questions regarding the Planning Board or this specific position please contact Sarah Raposa, Town Planner at sraposa@medfield.net.

The Planning Board is an elected town board of five members, each with a five year term. The purpose of the Planning Board is to guide the development of the Town in the best interests of all its residents. The Board has very specific responsibilities and authorities as granted by Massachusetts General Laws and the Medfield Zoning By-Laws.

The Planning Board is responsible for the review and approval of all subdivisions (the division of a tract of land into two or more lots) through a comprehensive process involving review by relevant regulatory agencies, public hearings, covenants with developers, performance bonding, and ongoing compliance monitoring.

Under “Site Plan Approval”, in the Zoning By-Laws, the Board also has the responsibility to assure that prior to any new construction or significant changes to an existing structure, other than single family dwellings, such factors as community needs, abutters’ concerns, visual amenities, safety issues, and environmental and historic features on the site and in adjacent areas are considered.

Any requests for Zoning By-Law changes or amendments are also reviewed by the Board. Public hearings are held to allow input from any abutters or other interested citizens. The Board is required to provide a recommendation on any Zoning By-Law amendment at Town Meeting, where a two-thirds vote is required to approve the change.

The Planning Board serves as a resource to assist interested individuals with the process of proposing plans or projects under the Zoning By-Laws. Communications are maintained on an ongoing basis with related Town agencies including the Zoning Board of Appeals and other planning groups within the Town such as the Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee.

Letters should describe your interest in the Planning Board as well as any professional experience or other qualifications that will complement the Board. Additionally, please contemplate the following in your letter of interest:

  • Do you have ideas about the direction the Board should be headed? If so, have you thought about integration of those ideas (meaning how the idea coalesces into existing regulations or whether new regulations would need to be created)?
  • Land use boards such as the Planning Board or ZBA do not always have the kind of discretion to approve or deny a specific project that residents often think they have. It is important to recognize and avoid any conflict of interest; not to pursue special privileges, and maintain confidentiality. Are you prepared for being thought of as a villain by some and a hero by others?
  • Planning Boards wear two hats, proactive and reactive, and the schedule is robust. The proactive hat is devoted to long-range planning and is often difficult to quantify as the effects aren’t recognized for several years, if at all. The reactive hat focuses on subdivisions and site plan review and the effects are more immediately seen and felt in the community. How would you rationalize your reactive hat with your proactive hat? Do you see an overlap?

 

Assisted living behind Clark Tavern

LCB Senior Living of Norwood, MA purchased land behind the Clark Tavern and  had previously indicated that they wanted to build assisted living there (about 70 units from memory).

This email below this afternoon from Mike Sullivan.  I asked Mike if he could scan the filing and put it online, where it is bound to generate great interest.


The Notice of Intent for the Assisted Living Facility proposed behind the Clark Tavern site was received yesterday. A copy was given to the Selectmen;s Office today and is available for any of you to review. Leslee tells me the Conservation Commission has [sic]

 

Housing Shortage in Medfield!

At the Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee meeting last night Ralph Costello shared with me the piece below he wrote on the housing shortage in town.  Ralph is an experienced local high end real estate developer (Unique Homes, Woodridge Road, and Old Medfield Square), who seems quite thoughtful about our local market, its needs, and creating curb appeal.  Professionally he has been building homes for our residents for decades, and now he is sharing his learned on our local  market expertise with the MSH-MPC.

His Old Medfield Square is the paradigm I point to as showing how “housing” can be the new “business of Medfield,” as when fully completed Old Medfield Square will profit the town about $500,000 a year.  When completed the 42 units will generate about $600,000 a year in real estate taxes, yet cost the town only about $50,000 a year in the costs of municipal services, primarily because there are few residents opting to live there who have school children – there was only one school child in the first 27 units that were occupied.

Therefore, I see building the right sort of housing as Medfield’s way to both generate new tax revenues and to reduce existing tax bills, because we know that we are a desirable residential community, and yet we do not seem to be a choice for businesses and commercial uses.

Here is Ralph’s article:


Housing Shortage in Medfield!

Housing shortages exists when the demand for housing or certain types of housing exceed the available supply at affordable prices. For a number of years this has been the state of housing in Medfield. Essentially, demand for housing can be broken down into four distinct demographic groups: Baby boomers (born 1946 -1964), Generation X (born 1965 -1982 ) Generation Y-Millennials, ( born 1982 -1998) and Seniors (age 65 and over) with each group looking for something different in size, space, lifestyle, amenities, and price.

In the last 40 years real estate development in Medfield has been almost exclusively single family homes which have been purchased by the baby boomer generation and generation X . Single family homes were built for these groups on land subdivided into % acre, 1 acre or 2 acre lots creating the many enclave neighborhoods that make up most of the housing stock in Medfield. This type of housing filled the need for both baby boomers and generation X. They wanted to raise families in safe, quiet neighborhoods. They wanted 4-5 bedrooms, multi-bath homes, two and three car garages, sidewalks, good size yards, swing sets and swimming pools. And, they wanted the best education for their children. Medfield’s commitment to quality schools was a great attraction.

Four decades of land planning and home designs that focused solely on single family homes, and the preferences and lifestyle of the demographic groups with growing families resulted in an abundance of available housing options for baby boomers in years past and currently for the growing families of generation X, but it has left a short supply of suitable housing for the remaining demographic groups: seniors, millenials and ironically, baby boomers who now want to downsize into smaller homes. For these groups housing in Medfield is now quite inadequate.

This leads us to ask some important questions as a community. What type of housing is needed for these groups? Is there affordable land available and is it zoned for this kind of housing? And finally, why is it necessary and important for Medfield to have adequate housing for these residents?

Type of housing needed in Medfield

The types of housing needed to respond to the needs of our citizens is a function of the changing needs of specific demographic groups.

Baby Boomers (76 Million nationally, 51 – 69 years old) want to simplify their lives by downsizing to smaller homes with 1800 sq. ft. to 2400 sq. ft. with a 2 car garage, one level living with a master bedroom and bath on the first level, a minimum of 2 additional bedrooms which can be located on the first floor or second floor. Bedrooms are important as they want to have friends, family, children, and grandchildren visit and stay overnight. Boomers also want an open

 

floor plan with the kitchen, dining area and great room side by side without separating walls. And, they want a private outside space for gardening. They are also looking for maintenance free homes. A higher density of homes (6-8 units per acre) is perfectly acceptable to baby boomers if the site plan includes ample open space.

Generation X (32 – 50 years old), now the growing family generation is taking over where the baby boomers left off. They are now occupying the 4-5 bedroom single family homes in neighborhoods and have a choice of many housing options. There is no housing shortage here!

Seniors (65 years or older) want much the same as baby boomers with emphasis on one level living. The large number of seniors who are still working, or retired but mobile and active, need housing that supports their independent lifestyle. These homes can be more compact with 1200 sq. ft. to 2,000 sq. ft., 2- 3 bedrooms and 1 or 2 car garages. A density of 6-10 units per acre works for this group if there is a private outside space or access to a walkable open space. Some seniors who can no longer live independently are in need of assisted living housing.

Generation Y – Millennial (80 million nationally, 18 to 30 years old) want one or two bedroom apartment or condo living with anywhere from 800 sq. ft. to 1400 sq. ft. of living space, with adequate parking for one or two vehicles. Millennial want to be mobile and not tied to the place they live, with a good 80% wanting to live in an urban setting. Changes in jobs, travel, and putting off marriage keeps them on the move. Convenient access to public transportation , retail shops and opportunities to socialize with other millenials is important. Higher densities are possible with this group (10 – 25 units per acre).

Is there affordable land available and is it zoned for this kind of housing?

The housing shortage in Medfield did not happen overnight. For decades the low density zoning regulation of 1-2 units per acre only permitted development of homes on large lots with grids of expensive streets and utilities. This drove up the cost of land and depleted the developable land at a greater rate. Today, the amount of privately owned land that could be developed is close to nonexistent. Medfield has become a “mature market” where there are no large privately owned parcels available, and only a small number of single lots vacant. Land prices are now to the point where homes are being torn down for the lots they sit on! The short supply of land has kept new home construction low and prices high, making Medfield unaffordable for many.

The land at Medfield State Hospital is the only large track of land where a portion of it could be allocated and re-zoned for different housing types.

Why is it important for Medfield to have adequate housing for its residents?

Another important change has taken place in the last 25 years: As the real estate market in Medfield changed and matured, baby boomers matured along with it. The baby boomers have

 

driven markets for everything from diapers and baby food in the 1940s. 1950s, and 1960s to housing choices in the last four decades. They are now in another phase of life, and along with seniors, want smaller homes to suit new lifestyles. They no longer need or want the large homes and lots, and the big tax bills that go with them. Their children have moved from the family home, attend college or live independently on their own. Households without children are at an all-time high, accounting for over 70% of the population.

Most longtime residents think of Medfield as home! They raised their families here, established friendships, and enjoyed the comfort and friendliness of living in a small town. And, more often than not, their children, grandchildren and extended families live locally. So, they want to downsize, stay in Medfield and continue to be part of the community. Seniors also need housing for an independent life style and the option of assisted living housing if they are to stay in Medfield.

Lack of adequate housing has already forced many to relocate out of Medfield. This is confirmed by the Metropolitan Area Planning Council statistics which show a 25 year net outmigration for baby boomers, seniors, and the generation Y population.

This generational flight from Medfield is not a temporary problem. It will continue if we don’t respond to our changing housing needs. It is imperative that we act now to ensure that different generations will be able to live side by side with family, friends, and children in a community they call home.

MSH-MPC’s newsletter

This is the   MSH-MPC’s newsletter this week  –

Medfield State Hospital Master Plan Committee Update

The MSHMPC is meeting August 19th with Judi Barrett of the Massachusetts Housing Partnership. Our housing workshop is intended to bring the committee up-to-date with the various housing types and regulations in the State. Committee Member Ralph Costello, a local developer, has written up information on the current state of housing in Medfield – from a demographic viewpoint. Part One of Housing in Medfield is presented below.

 

 

 

 

Photos from the August 18, 2015 Community Workshop at the Medfield DPW.  Our official walking tour of the MSH property was rained out but a number of hardy souls braved the weather and joined us for the visioning session.

 

Current Housing in Medfield

In the last 40 years real estate development in Medfield has been almost exclusively single family homes which have been purchased by the baby boomer generation and generation X .  Single family homes were built for these groups on land subdivided into ¾ acre, 1 acre or 2 acre lots creating the many enclave neighborhoods that make up most of the housing stock in Medfield. This type of housing filled the need for both baby boomers and generation X. They wanted to raise families in safe, quiet neighborhoods. They wanted 4-5 bedrooms, multi-bath homes, two and three car garages, sidewalks, good size yards, swing sets and swimming pools.  And, they wanted the best education for their children. Medfield’s commitment to quality schools was a great attraction.

Four decades of land planning and home designs that focused solely on single family homes, and the preferences and lifestyle of the demographic groups with growing families resulted in an abundance of available housing options for baby boomers in years past and currently for the  growing families of  generation X,  but it has left a short supply of suitable housing  for the remaining demographic groups: seniors, millenials and ironically, baby boomers who now want to downsize into smaller homes.

The types of housing needed to respond to the needs of our citizens is a function of the changing needs of specific demographic groups.

Baby Boomers  (76 Million nationally, 51 – 69 years old) want to simplify their lives by downsizing to smaller homes with 1800 sq. ft. to 2400 sq. ft. with a 2 car garage, one level living with a master bedroom and bath on the first level, a mimiumum of 2 additional bedrooms which can be located on the first floor or second floor. Bedrooms are important as they want to have friends, family, children, and grandchildren visit and stay overnight. Boomers also want an open floor plan with the kitchen, dining area and great room side by side without separating walls. And, they want a private outside space for gardening. They are also looking for maintenance free homes. A higher density of homes (6-8 units per acre) is perfectly acceptable to baby boomers if the site plan includes ample open space.

Generation X  (32 – 50 years old), now the growing family generation is taking over where the baby boomers left off. They are now occupying the 4-5 bedroom single family homes in neighborhoods and have a choice of many housing options.

Seniors  (65 years or older) want much the same as baby boomers with emphasis on one level living. The large number of seniors who are  still working, or retired but mobile and active, need housing that supports their independent lifestyle. These homes can be more compact with 1200 sq. ft. to 2,000 sq. ft.,  2- 3 bedrooms and 1 or 2 car garages. A density of 6-10 units per acre works for this group if there is a private outside space or access to a walkable open space.
Some seniors who can no longer live independently are in need of assisted living housing.

Generation Y – Millennials  (80 million nationally, 18 to 30 years old)  want one or two bedroom  apartment or condo living with anywhere from 800 sq. ft. to 1400 sq. ft. of living space, with adequate parking for one or two vehicles. Millennials want to be mobile and not tied to the place they live, with a good 80% wanting to live in an urban setting. Changes in jobs, travel, and putting off marriage keeps them on the move. Convenient access to public transportation , retail shops and opportunities to socialize with other millenials is important. Higher densities are possible with this group (10 – 25 units per acre ).
Watch for more “Housing in Medfield” to follow.

Correction: Our email newsletter contained an error last week. The sentence “The only exception was a prior agreement allowing a 12 acre portion of the Sledding Hill area to be used for a single public building ” should read “The only exception is that the Town shall restrict development to a 12 acre portion of Parcel B (the Sledding Hill) area and place the remaining area in an Agricultural Preservation Restriction.[1]

Please accept our apologies for the error.

[1]  Land Disposition Agreement for the Purchase of MSH, January 29, 2015

 

To sign up for our weekly email blasts, get more information,or schedule a MSHMPC representative to speak with your Club or Organization please contact Sarah Raposa, Medfield Town Planner at sraposa@medfield.net

 

BoS on 8/18

Tuesday August 18, 2015 @ 7:00 PM
AGENDA (SUBJECT TO CHANGE)

7:30 PM  Planning Board
Selectmen and Planning Board vote to elect candidate to fill vacancy

7:50 PM  Medfield State Hospital Building and Grounds Committee Update on activities

OLD BUSINESS
Vote to approve August 4, 2015 meeting minutes

Review Selectmen calendar; discuss topics for next meeting

Selectman Peterson wishes to discuss Selectmen’ s previous goals and accomplishments; give consideration to developing new goals

NEW BUSINESS
Vote to sign Chapter 90 – Reimbursement Request in the amount of $153,394.00. This pertains to the purchase of a Milton Caterpillar model 930M by DPW

Resignation notice received from Barbara Jacobs, Medfield Historic District Commission

Other business that may arise

BoS minutes for 8/4

Meeting Minutes
August 4, 2015
Chenery Meeting Room draft

PRESENT: Selectmen DeSorgher, Fisher, Peterson; Town Administrator Sullivan; Town Counsel Cerel; Administrative Assistant Clarke
Chairman DeSorgher called the meeting to order at 7:00 PM and read the announcements.

Selectman DeSorgher said that he feels it is important to highlight the water ban restrictions as he has heard from a number of residents that not everyone is following the rules. He cited the water ban restrictions: there is no outside watering allowed between the hours of 9AM to 5PM every day. If your house number is an odd number you may water on that calendar day. Even numbered houses may water on even calendar days. Selectmen concur that Police Chief Meaney and Superintendent Feeney be advised to be observant if there are  citizens abusing the water ban. Town Bylaw stipulates that any violation of the water ban carries a fine: 1st offense $25.00; second $50.00; third and subsequent $100.00.

OTHER POST EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (OPEB)
Attorney Cerel submitted to the Chairman his memo outlining the process for implementing the OPEB Trust. It is necessary for the Board to appoint two citizens at large and three staff members. These Trustees will decide where to invest and authorize the Treasurer to make those investments. The Board of Selectmen will have the authority to amend the OPEB Trust when necessary.
Names mentioned for consideration are Treasurer Georgia Colivas, Town  Accountant Joy Ricciuto and Michael Sullivan. Mr. Sullivan will contact residents Peter Moran and Warrant Committee Chairman Michael Marcucci who may have interest in joining. The Board agreed that the OPEB discussion continue to the September 1, 2015 meeting.

MINUTES
VOTE: Motion by Selectman Fisher, seconded by Selectman Peterson to approve the July 21, 2015 meeting minutes with amendments. Vote was unanimous

GREEN STREET PROJECT
Mr. Sullivan reported that the project is on hold due to some employees on vacation and DPW waiting for the delivery of castings. This is a priority project to complete before school opening. Much of the underground work has been completed. We appreciate the patience of residents.

SPECIAL ELECTION TO FILL A VACANCY
Planning Board member Elissa Franco has resigned her position as she moved out of Town. The Planning Board gave notice to the Selectmen that they recommend the appointment of Paul McKechnie to fill Ms. Franco’s term. As Planning Board member Stephen Browne was present this evening he was informed that MASS general law, chapter 41, section 11 stipulates that the boards meet jointly to elect the candidate. It is agreed to hold this election at the next Selectmen’s meeting August 18, 2015 8:00 PM.

STATE HOSPITAL MASTER PLANNING COMMITIEE
The Committee was invited to attend the Selectmen’s meeting to present an update on their activities to the Selectmen. Chairman Stephen Nolan gave an overview of their work and explained that members of this committee and the state hospital resource committee formed several subcommittees to focus on the process so that the project moves forward in a timely manner. A draft copy of the committee’s report was presented to the Selectmen and each subcommittee gave a brief overview of their accomplishments.

Following are the names of the subcommittee members and highlights of their focus:
Working with the design consultant VHB/RKG (financial advisor) as Project Liaisons are Teresa James, Randal Karg and Sarah Raposa, Town Planner.
Teresa James reported that her group met with VHB on May 6 to begin the year-long planning process. The focus is to provide reasonable economic and financial impacts on the Town while maintaining the residents’ values. Public
workshops are planned over the next several months Communications members Ralph Costello, Randal Karg, Gil Rodgers, Brandie Erb, Lucille Fisher, Ros Smythe, Alec Stevens, Sarah Raposa Brandi Erb and her committee set up a website to update and keep the public current on issues relevant to the
property; put together press releases and notifications that will be inserted in the Thursday school packets; plan informational sessions with local organizations. In addition they will have a booth at Medfield Day to provide up to date information.

Survey subcommittee, Patrick Casey, Teresa James, Jean Mineo and high school interns:
Olivia Taylor, Marykate McNeil and Dana Cruickshank
Pat Casey remarked that his sub-committee was happy to receive
1,073 responses to survey #1 which had asked for ideas of
what should be or should not be explored. Survey #2 is
currently open until August 9 and hopefully again
We will receive a good response. There was a walking tour of
the property on July 22 with good attendance and another is
planned for Tuesday August 18.

Financial Advisory, Stephen Nolan, Ken Richard, Gil Rodgers, Bill Massaro, Mike Marcucci Gil Rodgers spoke on behalf of the sub-committee commenting
they hope to develop realistic assumptions for financial analyses; obtain student projections for the next 10 years along with costs per student. A major focus will be developing an RFP to help define demolition costs for buildings that will require demolition

Developers Roundtable, Stephen Nolan, Ralph Costello, Ken Richard Ralph Costello talked about their approach to reach out to qualified developers to come see and discuss the project that will be followed by a roundtable discussion. At present 12-14 individuals from a variety of housing communities have responded for the date of August 11

Lightning Strike, Stephen Browne, Ralph Costello, Gil Rodgers Stephen Nolan
Stephen Browne reported that they are moving forward to identify potential users for the property in the fields of educational, non-profit, bio-tech.

Committee Outreach for Seniors, Stephen Browne, Ralph Costello, Gil Rodgers
Stephen Browne explained that they have met with the Council on Aging to discuss the type of housing seniors favor along with size and price range

Committee Outreach for Cultural Visioning is led by Jean Mineo
Jean said that the Cultural Community is developing a vision For the potential to re-use existing building(s) where possible to provide programs for inspiration, discovery and education for residents and visitors to the area

Committee Outreach Reports, Ros Smythe and Stephen Browne
Reached out to the Medfield Energy Committee to discuss the
best practices of energy use and energy conservation for the
buildings and consider space for solar energy generation

The Selectmen recognized resident John Harney.
Mr. Harney remarked that this project needs very careful consideration. We will not do this a second time. He is concerned that the committee’s thrust is on development and if we head in that direction it may be more than necessary, therefore more than the Town could handle.  He feels the committee is moving much too fast.

The Selectmen agree that the Committee is building consensus to find out the desires of the community and this is the time for the townspeople to come forward with ideas and visions as to what should be on the site. Altogether there is remarkable talent exploring all the different options which makes it very exciting to move forward.

CHAPTER90
Vote: On a motion made and seconded it was voted unanimously to sign Chapter 90 Reimbursement Form pertaining to North Street and Green Street project in the amount of $52,741.64

ANNUAL APPOINTMENTS
The Board reviewed the lists of names of committee, commission, board appointments for 2015-2016. Mr. DeSorgher noted that the Downtown Study Committee has not met in a very long time and feels the committee needs to be restored. We should try to find additional members for this important committee.

LICENSES & PERMITS
VOTED unanimously to grant Medfield Youth Basketball Association permission to post signs from August 24 to September 15 advertising registration for the 2015-2014 basketball season

VOTED unanimously to grant a Block Party Permit to the neighbors of Cypress Street, Partridge Road, Erik Road, Morse Lane and Curtis Drive for September 19, 3-9PM

VOTED unanimously to grant Emerson Road neighbors a Block Party Permit for Saturday September 19 4-8PM

SELECTMEN REPORI’
Selectmen Peterson announced that he will conduct his first Friday of the month office hour at The CENTER this Friday August 7 from 9-10 AM. Beginning Years Children’s Center, North Street is conducting their annual fund raising Lemonade Stand August 3-7, 10:30-11:30 AM. He encourages residents to stop by and donate to a good cause.

Selectman DeSorgher said that the Sheriff’s Department scheduled to send a crew to Medfield this week to help clean up the debris on Causeway Street, however, he said he called their office to postpone as he observed that the weeds are very high in that area and it would be difficult to do a complete clean up. Perhaps they will come in the early spring to do the work. He remains very concerned with the beavers on Hartford Street and the amount of damage to the trees along with the possible flooding of that road. Mr. Sullivan remarked that the Trustees and Board of Health will be attending our September 15 to discuss the issue. Selectman DeSorgher had received comment from a resident who has observed that the Police Officers are not in the vicinity of downtown. He spoke with Police Chief Meaney and learned that the Chief is instituting a “Park, Lock and Patrol Program” to place officers in the area on foot patrol for perhaps 20-30 minutes a few times per day. Mr. DeSorgher learned that the ABCC has issued a Notice Hearing pertaining to Medfield Commons, 270 Main Street for violation of selling alcohol to a person under 21. He is concerned and asked Town Counsel what options do we have. Counsel advised the Selectmen could request a hearing with the owner.  Selectman DeSorgher addressed an email directed to the Board from a former resident who is dismayed about the condition of the former Clark tavern building on Main Street. Mr. Cerel advised the Board that the land court has yet to render their decision and feels that the  case may go to trial. If that happens it could be another two years before the matter is settled. Mr. DeSorgher queried what can be done now. Mr. Cerel said that he is willing to contact the attorneys and perhaps set up a meeting with the parties involved to try and work out a plan for the tavern that will satisfy all involved. Selectman Peterson volunteered his services as mediator.

ADJOURNMENT
Selectman Fisher moved to adjourn the meeting, seconded by Selectman Peterson. It was voted unanimously to adjourn the meeting at 9:10 PM.