MFi volunteer nominees

mfi-volunteer-awards

The 2017 nominations for the Medfield Foundation volunteer awards have closed and the nominees are as follows:

Lifetime Achievement:

  • Jim Schwartz and Patti Schwartz for their combined 77 years of service to the BSA, 46 years of it in Medfield, for Medfield Boy Scout Troop 89.

Volunteer of the Year :

  • Tracy Fedak and Tracey Rogers for chairing, running, and inspiring the hugely involved and successful All Night Graduation Party (ANGP) for the past 3 years.
  • Linda Frawley for 13 years of lead-by-example service organizing and leading the 400 girls, aged 5-17,  in the Medfield Girl Scouts.
  • Nancy Irwin and Mary Pat McSharry for creating and running the SWAP area at the Transfer Station for the past 8 and 4 years, respectively.
  • Jean Mineo for founding the Cultural Alliance of Medfield, the Holiday Stroll, and implementing the Straw Hat Park, and working on the Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee.

Youth Volunteers:

  • Lily Doctoroff for organizing Bigger than Bullying, starting a Gender Equality Club, and working with the Medfield’s Vine Lake Preservation Trust, Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee, New Life Home Refurnishing, National Honor Society, and Medway Family Shelter.
  • Anne Phipps for helping build a school in Kenya, assisting at a camp for seriously ill children, volunteering for Project Teamwork, Student Council, Medfield Cares About Prevention, peer tutoring, Dean of Students Advisory Board, Putting for Patients, Medfield Food Cupboard, and Digital Learning Day.

The Medfield Foundation (MFi) annually fetes at its Volunteer Awards those individuals, suggested by fellow residents, whose extraordinary efforts and activities have made a special marked difference in the quality of life in Medfield.

At a reception at 3PM on March 19  at The Center the town will celebrate all the individual nominated this year, and the named Volunteer of the Year, Youth Volunteer of the Year, and Lifetime Achievement Award recipients.

The Volunteers Awards are based entirely on nominations submitted by the public, and solely on the information submitted.  The Medfield Foundation has scheduled a meeting of the volunteer awards judges for February 15.

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Brothers Marketplace generously sponsors the MFi Volunteer Awards, and support is also received from The Rockland Trust Charitable Foundation.

MEC on 1/12

MEC

Draft minutes

Medfield Energy Committee

Jan 12, 2017

 

Fred Bunger presiding, Jerry McCarty, Cynthia Greene, Lee Alinsky, Fred Davis, Paul Fechtelklotter (taking minutes)

 

  1. December 8 meeting minutes accepted. Fred B. will make effort to put all 2016 meeting minutes in a single location for easier access.

 

  1. Annual report – FB.

Made minor updates to the draft report. Still awaiting updates for the solar projects – Fred B will submit revised report once he receives them.

 

  • Green Communities –FB:

 

Fred B spoke with Kelly on Medfield’s application status. He received very positive feedback but no official response.

Axxum confirmed that there is money available for her to assist with our application for initial grants after Medfield receives confirmation of achieving Green Community status.

The expected deadline for submitting the grant application is 3 March. Jerry will be “on point” for the grant submittal with MEC support.

The MEC will have to identify priorities for spending the ~$148K in grant money, using Table 2 of the Energy Reduction plan as the starting point. Retro-commissioning of the High School and Blake are likely to be high on the prioritized list of projects since it will likely be difficult to secure funding for those projects in a competitive grant scenario.

Jerry has received preliminary pricing for retro-commissioning and EMS software upgrades from vendors and should have more data points by our February meeting.  The costs were highlighted at the December MEC meeting and total ~$80K. He is also just starting to develop a list of items to include in his capital submission to the town.

Jerry is getting bids for replacing halogen lights at the library, weatherizing windows at the library, and replacing an exterior door at the library. Fred D. volunteered to assist with the library lighting effort.

Fred B. will make sure that committee members have the final version of Table 4 that was included in our Green Communities application package.

 

  1. LED streetlights – FD:

Fred D. walked through his analysis of typical maintenance/support contract terms that Medfield should put in place if the town owned the lights.

New funding sources and grants have recently become available that will reduce the net cost of the replacement effort from ~$89K to ~$67K

There are limited funds available so it is important to move forward quickly.

Fred B. will send Fred D’s package and data to Jerry and Mike Sullivan. He will also write a letter to the Board of Selectman on behalf of the MEC to start the process.

Should the project go forward, Medfield will still have to choose an LED technology. We can either leverage MAPC to make a recommendation or do it ourselves.  A suggestion was made to engage Westwood for advice since they recently went through a similar effort.

 

  • Town Solar – JM:

 

DPW Solar: No change in status since the last MEC meeting. Still engaged with Solect (who is the SRECs aggregator, solar maintenance, and reporting), who advised town to wait until next round of solar programs.

 

Public Safety Solar: everything is set but still waiting for ACA approval, which should come before 19 January.

 

  1. Solarize Medfield Status:

Tabled until February meeting.

 

  1. Other business.

Tabled discussion on best way to archive committee materials until February meeting.

 

Meeting adjourned around 9:15.

Storm impacts

Note:

  1. town offices are closed today.
  2. emergency #s for Eversource and Verizon

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Election candidates

20170209-candidate-list

Angel Run opportunity

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This from the Angel Run –

The MFi Angel Run is looking for a volunteer to chair the Publicity Coordinator position. This person will coordinate press releases, social media and other marketing activities. This is a two year commitment with the first year working directly with the current chair with the goal of transitioning the role fully in the second year. The role requires approximately 1-2 hours per week August – December. If you are interested, please email Rose Colleran (rosecolleran@yahoo.com) for additional information.

BoS 2/7

TOWN OF MEDFIELD POSTED: MEETING TOWN CLERK NOTICE fO"frl otttf.nf.£[o.MAS~ . f£6 -3 p 2: 0 2 POSTED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF M.G.~~8iillTER 39 ~ECTION 23A AS AMENDED. OffGE OF fHt Board of Selectmen iG!J~! CLERf< Board or Committee PLACE OF MEETING DAY, DATE, AND TIME Town Hall, Chenery Meeting Room 2nd floor Tuesday February 7, 2017@ 7:00 PM AGENDA (SUBJECT TO CHANGE) 7:00 PM 495 Partnership Discuss rail line; general partnership update 7:30 PM Medfield Housing Authority, Candace Loewen, Director Update on Tilden Village expansion PENDING Town Administrator evaluation Discuss warrant articles Discussion pertaining to a Medfield Appreciation Day at the flying field located at the hospital site NEW BUSINESS Department of Energy Resources designates Medfield as a Green Community Vote to sign Engagement letter with town auditors Powers & Sullivan LLC INFORMATIONAL Norfolk County Registry of Deeds, William O'Donnell, Register will hold office hours on Thursday February 9, 2017 10 AM to Noon, Town Hall 2nd floor Other business that may come before the Board of Selectmen Signatured _ 3 __ (? Date COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RESOURCES Charles D. Baker Governor Karyn E. Polito Lt. Governor 100 CAMBRIDGE ST., SUITE 1020 BOSTON, MA 02114 Telephone: 617-626-7300 Facsimile: 617-727-0030 Mark Fisher, Chair, Board of Selectmen 459 Main Street Medfield, MA, 02052 Dear Chairman Fisher: Matthew A. Beaton Secretary Judith F. Judson Commissioner February 1, 2017 Congratulations on the Town of Medfield's designation as a Green Community! This designation is quite an achievement and reflects the hard work and tireless efforts your community has exhibited in meeting the Green Communities Designation and Grant Program's five criteria. Meeting these criteria is proof of Medfield's position as an energy leader in Massachusetts, poised to reduce its energy costs, improve the local environment and implement energy efficiency and renewable energy projects with funding through the Green Communities Designation and Grant Program. The purpose of this letter is to confirm your Green Community designation in writing and provide you with program information and activities relevant to you as a newly-designated Green Community. Along with this designation, the Town of Medfield has been awarded a grant of $146,815. A formulaic allocation has been established that consists of a base grant per community of $125,000, plus an amount adjusted for population and income, with an additional $10,000 for designated communities that met Criterion 1 through adoption of as-of-right siting for renewable energy generation. To receive this grant award, the Town of Medfield will be required to submit a project application proposing how these funds will be spent. The Green Communities Division ("Division") will begin accepting grant applications immediately on 9 am, February 13, 2017. The Green Communities grant application guidance with submission instructions is provided as a separate attached document. Please be sure to work with your Regional Coordinator, Kelly Brown at 508-767-2703, to identify potential energy projects and coordinate with vendors and utility companies. SIGNS Each designated Green Community receives four ( 4) 12" x 18" aluminum signs to be displayed in your community. While you are free to place these signs wherever you choose within your community, the Division recommends installing them in highly-visible, high pedestrian traffic areas (such as near municipal offices, schools, and downtown business districts, and/or within parks and along walking paths). If installed on roadways, the Division recommends hanging them at approximately eye-level for motorists, to maximize readability. DESIGNATED 20UI CERTIFICATES Each Green Community will receives an official certificate for display pronouncing the municipality's designation as a Green Community and including the designation date and signatures of the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs, and Commissioner of the Department of Energy Resources. FACES OF GREEN COMMUNITIES WEB PAGE Finally, the Commonwealth is extremely proud of and inspired by the efforts of the 185 Green Communities. From the tip of Cape Cod to the Berkshires, Green Communities such as yours are pursuing their own unique pathways to a clean, sustainable, and more economical energy future. To showcase the diversity of the Green Communities and their individual efforts and results, we have created a Faces of Green Communities web page. Within three months of your designation as a Green Community, we ask that you complete the attached questionnaire and return it to us, along with a photo of your local energy team posing with one of your mounted Green Community signs. Please send your materials to Jane Pfister at jane.pfister@state.ma.us. Once we receive your information and photo, we will quickly add your story to the web site. Again, congratulations on becoming a Green Community. The Division looks forward to working with the Town of Medfield to meet the objectives of the Green Communities Designation and Grant Program and to support you in meeting your local energy goals. Thank you for your commitment to a cleaner energy future for Massachusetts. Sincerely, Joanne Bissetta Deputy Director, Green Communities Division Cc: Michael Sullivan, Town Administrator Axum Teferra, MAPC Kelly Brown, Green Communities Regional Coordinator20170207-agenda-short_page_220170207-agenda-short_page_320170207-agenda-short_page_4

As a Green Community, Medfield gets DOER grant of $146,815

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Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs

Department of Energy Resources

Governor Charles D. Baker

Lt. Governor Karyn E. Polito

Secretary Matthew A. Beaton

Commissioner Judith F. Judson

 

Press Release Contact: Kevin O’Shea — 617-626-7362 or Kevin.O’Shea@state.ma.us

 

Baker-Polito Administration Designates 30 Cities and Towns as Green Communities

64% of Massachusetts Residents Live In Green Community

 

BOSTON – February 2, 2017 – The Baker-Polito Administration today announced that an additional 30 Massachusetts cities and towns have been designated by the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) as Green Communities, committing to an ambitious renewable energy agenda to reduce energy consumption and emissions. With today’s designation, over half of the Commonwealth’s municipalities have earned their Green Communities designation and 64 percent of residents live in a Green Community. The 30 new Green Communities are now eligible for grants totaling $6,460,385 to complete renewable energy and energy efficiency projects in their communities. Since the program began in 2010, DOER’s Green Communities division has awarded over $65 million in grant funding to the Commonwealth’s cities and town through designation and competitive grant rounds.

 

“The Green Communities program is an excellent example of how state and local governments can work together to save taxpayer money and promote responsible energy policies,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “The thirty new Green Communities named today will now have additional resources to invest in energy efficiency and renewable energy, locking in energy savings for residents and reducing their carbon footprints.”

 

“Our municipal partners continue to help lead the way on renewable energy by adopting practices that reduce their energy consumption, while channeling savings toward vital municipal functions, like public safety and education,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “We will continue to provide cities and towns across the Commonwealth the tools they need to reduce energy costs, usage and emissions.”

 

The Commonwealth’s 185 Green Communities range from the Berkshires to Cape Cod and are home to 64 percent of Massachusetts’ population in municipalities as large as Boston and as small as Rowe. Under the Green Communities Act, cities and towns must meet five criteria to be designated a Green Community and receive funding, including reducing municipal energy consumption by 20 percent over five years. The newly designated Green Communities have committed to reducing their energy consumption amounting to savings of $6,241,862 of energy costs and 2,234,090 MMBtu in five years, energy use equivalent to heating and powering nearly 2,718 homes, and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 27,641 metric tons, equivalent to taking 5,819 cars off the roads.

 

“When Massachusetts’ cities and towns invest in renewable energy and energy efficiency programs everyone wins, from taxpayers savings to a statewide reduction in emissions,” said Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Beaton. “With today’s designation, DOER’s Green Communities program continues to prove an effective tool in building a clean, renewable energy future for the Commonwealth.”

 

“DOER is proud to work with cities and towns across Massachusetts as they take important steps in embracing renewable energy and energy efficiency at the local level,” said Department of Energy Resources Commissioner Judson. “Today’s designations are simply the beginning of an important relationship between the Commonwealth and our municipal partners as we work towards our shared clean energy goals.”

 

DOER awarded funding for projects in these newly designated Green Communities include:

 

 

 

Municipality                        Award

 

Agawam                               $207,970

Blandford                            $138,425

Bolton                                  $141,060

Brockton                              $526,000

Charlton                               $166,570

Chelsea                                 $312,460

Chicopee                              $367,160

Clarksburg                            $141,590

Dartmouth                            $223,750

Dover                                   $137,145

Erving                                  $142,905

Fitchburg                              $306,265

Granville                              $139,280

Hawley                                 $136,920

Malden                                 $332,540

Marshfield                            $182,720

Medfield                              $146,815

New Bedford                       $604,305

North Adams                       $194,580

North Andover                    $169,390

Northbridge                         $176,515

Plainfield                              $137,575

Rockport                              $148,670

Salisbury                              $160,695

Southborough                      $142,865

Southbridge                         $206,130

Ware                                     $169,535

Warren                                 $157,740

Westfield                             $266,565

Winchendon                         $176,245

 

 

A full description of projects funded by today’s Green Communities designation grants can be found here.

 

“Congratulations to the people of Erving for their designation as a Green Community.  Reducing our carbon footprint and energy consumption is critical to fighting climate change and preserving our environment for future generations,” said Senate President Stan Rosenberg (D-Amherst). “This grant funding will help build out future clean energy infrastructure to protect our environment and increase energy efficiency.”

 

“Leadership and action at the municipal level are essential to our state’s success in conserving resources and capturing renewable energy,” said Senate Minority Leader Bruce Tarr (R-Gloucester). “Rockport and North Andover are making an important commitment to our future by becoming Green Communities, and receiving significant grant funding to propel initiatives that work for people in each town and will make a difference for our Commonwealth.”

 

“North Andover and Salisbury join two other communities in the First Essex Senate District, Newburyport and Amesbury, which have earned the Green Communities designation,” said State Senator Kathleen O’Connor Ives (D-Newburyport).  “The grant funding that accompanies this designation will strengthen the ability of North Andover and Salisbury to continue their energy efficiency initiatives, including upgrades to heating and cooling systems in municipal buildings, installation of LED street lighting, and investment in electronic vehicles.”

“I’m thrilled that Blandford, Clarksburg, Hawley, North Adams and Plainfield are now designated as Green Communities,” said State Senator Adam G. Hinds (D- Pittsfield). “Taking this step to improve their collective efforts to advance energy efficiency and renewable energy is good news for the entire Commonwealth.”

“As our Commonwealth continues moving towards clean and renewable energy sources, the Green Communities Grant program has played a vital role in helping municipalities achieve their individual sustainability goals and reduce energy consumption,” said State Senator Sal DiDomenico (D-Everett). “I commend the City of Chelsea for their impressive efforts and hope that this award will help to further advance the great work already underway.”

 

“Our office is thrilled that Salisbury is moving towards finding cleaner energy solutions to reduce long term energy costs in the community,” said State Representative James Kelcourse (R-Amesbury). “We are looking forward to working with the town to qualify for important grant funding as a result of the designation.”

“I want to thank the Baker-Polito administration for providing the City of Chelsea with a Green Community Grant,” said State Representative RoseLee Vincent (D-Revere).  “Through their generosity, the City of Chelsea will be able to use this funding to work with the DOER to find clean energy solutions that will, over time, reduce long-term energy costs and help the City’s local economy.”

 

“This is a win-win for our region. Through the Green Communities Program, Erving has an opportunity to reduce its long-term energy costs and support clean, renewable energy,” said State Representative Susannah Whipps (R-Athol). “It’s such an honor when our smaller communities are recognized for forward thinking when it comes to sustainability.”

“The small rural town of Plainfield has worked hard to earn the Green Community designation, and I commend its citizens for their vision to use energy more efficiently and for making this commitment to transition toward a cleaner and greener energy future,” said State Representative Stephen Kulik (D-Worthington). “The community, its people, and the entire planet will benefit from Plainfield’s dedication to strong environmental values.”

 

“This is very exciting news for the small town of Blandford in my district. With new leadership in the community with a vision for the future this is welcome news,” said State Representative William Smitty Pignatelli (D-Lenox). “I want to thank DOER for recognizing the impacts, even in our smallest towns, of investing in renewable energy.” 

 

“I want to congratulate the City of Chelsea for all their work toward this Green Communities designation and the Department of Energy Resources for their guidance,” said State Representative Daniel Ryan (D-Boston). “The Green Communities program is great example of state and local partnerships lessening the impact on our environment while helping to run our cities and towns more efficiently.”

 

Under the Green Communities Act, DOER’s Green Communities Designation and Grant Program can provide up to $20 million annually to qualified cities and towns.  The goal of the Designation Grant Program is support communities’ investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that further the clean energy goals determined by the designated communities.  Initial Designation Grants are based on a $125,000 base for each designated Green Community, plus additional amounts tied to per capita income and population, and for municipalities that provide as-of-right siting for renewable energy generation.

 

“The Green Communities Program is an outstanding example of the strong partnership that the Baker-Polito Administration and the Legislature have forged with cities and towns,” said Geoffrey C. Beckwith, the Executive Director of the Massachusetts Municipal Association. “Communities all across the state will use these grant funds for innovative programs to reduce energy usage and invest in renewable energy projects, and the benefits will flow to taxpayers and the environment.”

 

Funding for these grants is available through proceeds from carbon allowance auctions under the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) and Alternative Compliance Payments (ACP) paid by retail electric suppliers that do not meet their Renewable Portfolio Standard compliance obligations through the purchase of Renewable Energy Certificates.