Category Archives: Volunteers

Town clean up tomorrow

From Jonathan Chechile –

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Looking forward to seeing everyone at God Loves Medfield! Come clean up the community, and then enjoy lunch from Cutlets.

Don’t forget your rake! We will be providing extra’s, but please bring a pair of gloves and a rake. We will be providing bags for trash collection.

April 22, 2017

Community Celebration: 12 – 3:00 pm

Service Projects: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

 

Instructions and notes:

Don’t forget your rake! We will be providing extra’s, but please bring a pair of gloves and a rake. We will be providing bags for trash collection.

If you are planning on serving at a downtown location, please meet at Gazebo Park next to the Medfield Public Library: 468 Main Street, Medfield, MA 02052 for a quick time of welcome and then Location Captains will be heading to Baxter park, Meetinghouse Pond, or the Dwight Derby house.

If you are planning on serving at the Charles River Cleanup, Kingsbury Pond, Medfield State Hospital, or Hinkley Park, please meet at the worksite. There will be a Location Captains there to greet you.

 

  • If you are planning on serving at the Charles River Cleanup, please do not bring kids under 10, as we will be working along West Street as it passes over the Charles, and along the banks.
  • Note for Scouts. Den Leaders will be communicating with the pack as the where you will be meeting, and what time to meet if other than 9.
  • Note on Community Service hours. For Scouts and any/all in need of community service hours, the Location Captain will have a form to give you confirming you served.

Community Celebration: 12 – 3:00 pm

Meet at Gazebo Park next to the Medfield Public Library: 468 Main Street, Medfield, MA 02052.

Food will be served a little after 12 thanks to Cutlets, and Ice cream and drinks will be provided thanks to Brothers Marketplace.

After everyone is served, representatives of the Medfield Green, the Lowell Mason House, and other community partners and friends will give updates on projects they are working on, and then there will be games and fun for the whole family!

 

Medfield Foundation volunteer awards

voty 2017

Photo by Colleen Sullivan        Patch article and many photos

2017 Medfield Foundation Volunteer Awards

The 2017 volunteer awards were held at the Center on March 19, 2017.  The volunteers nominated by fellow residents this year, shown in the group photo above (except Lida Frawley, who was ill), were:

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT

Jim Schwartz and Patti Schwartz for their combined 77 years of service to the BSA, 46 years of it in Medfield, for Medfield Boy Scout Troop 89.

VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR

Tracy Fedak and Tracey Rogers for chairing, running, and inspiring the hugely involved and successful All Night Graduation Party (ANGP) for the past 3 years.

Linda Frawley for 13 years of lead-by-example service organizing and leading the 400 girls, aged 5-17,  in the Medfield Girl Scouts.

Nancy Irwin and Mary Pat McSharry for creating and running the SWAP area at the Transfer Station for the past 8 and 4 years, respectively.

Jean Mineo for founding the Cultural Alliance of Medfield, the Holiday Stroll, implementing the Straw Hat Park, and working on the Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee.

YOUTH VOLUNTEERS

Lily Doctoroff for organizing Bigger than Bullying, starting a Gender Equality Club, and working with the Medfield’s Vine Lake Preservation Trust, Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee, New Life Home Refurnishing, National Honor Society, and Medway Family Shelter.

Anne Phipps for helping build a school in Kenya, assisting at a camp for seriously ill children, volunteering for Project Teamwork, Student Council, Medfield Cares About Prevention, peer tutoring, Dean of Students Advisory Board, Putting for Patients, Medfield Food Cupboard, and Digital Learning Day.

Special Recognition:

Lily Doctoroff is the 2017 Youth Volunteer of the Year.

Jean Mineo is the 2017 Volunteer of the Year.

Jim Schwartz and Patti Schwartz receive the 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award.

Jim & Patti Schwartz – Medfield Foundation 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award

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Jim & Patti Schwartz – 2017 Medfield Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award

Jim and Patti Schwartz were selected as to receive the 2017 Medfield Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award last month by the judges.  Jim and Patti were nominated by Gus Murby, with input from the other leaders of Boy Scout Troop 89, per Gus.

Jim and Patti, plus all the remarkable eight other Medfield volunteers who were nominated this year will be celebrated at the reception next Sunday, March 19 at 3PM at The Center. The public is invited to attend.

Brothers Marketplace generously sponsored the 2017 Medfield Foundation volunteer awards and support was also received from the Rockland Trust Charitable Foundation.

Below is the nomination submitted by Gus Murby.

 


 

This recommendation is submitted as a combined recommendation for both Jim and Patti Schwartz, primarily for the involvement they have had over several decades as adult leaders in Medfield’s Troop 89 Boy Scout Troop. Jim and Patti have functioned as a seamless team throughout that time in working to meet the needs of the troop. The intention of this recommendation is not just to recognize them as two individuals worthy of consideration for this award, but to recognize their collaborative partnership over all this time and to acknowledge the extraordinary impact that partnership has had on the success of Troop 89 over an extended period.

 

Jim Schwartz has been a life-long volunteer leader with the Boy Scouts of America who has, over the past 23 years, held leadership positions with Medfield Troop 89. Extending from his own personal scouting career where he earned Eagle Scout rank, Jim started his career as a volunteer adult leader back in 1969 as an Assistant Scout Master in Troop 662 in Cheviot, Ohio. Jim subsequently filled a number of adult leadership positions over the ensuring years in both Ohio and Herndon, VA, where Jim was the founding Scoutmaster for a new Boy Scout troop. Over the course of his four years as Scoutmaster of the newly formed Herndon Boy Scout troop, 5 scouts earned the rank of Eagle Scout – a remarkable achievement for a troop that had just formed. Jim first started serving as a volunteer adult Boy Scout leader in Medfield Troop 89 in 1994, serving as an Assistant Scoutmaster from 1994 – 2003. In 2003, Jim took on the job of serving as Troop 89’s Troop Committee Chairman, a position he held from 2003 through 2016.

 

The job of Troop Committee Chairman is a critical one for ensuring the ongoing success of a Boy Scout Troop. The Boy Scout Troop Committee effectively functions as a Board of Directors for a Boy Scout Troop, but the role of the committee involves more than just formal oversight. The Troop Committee, and the Troop Committee Chairman, in particular, works closely with the Troop Scoutmaster to ensure the troop has the funding, equipment, leadership, and standards that are needed to ensure the troop operates in a manner that offers meaningful development opportunities for scouts while maintaining high standards of safety and decorum. In this role, because of his extensive experience in scouting, Jim has been a unique source of insight, judgment, and practical advice on what is needed to run a highly effective scouting program. The effectiveness of Jim’s insight and experience can readily be seen in the high enrollment the troop has maintained over the years; the numerous high adventure trips that the troop has offered to its more experienced scouts; and in the number of scouts who have achieved the prestigious rank of Eagle Scout. Over the course of Jim’s tenure with Troop 89, a total of 73 scouts have earned the rank of Eagle Scout – a number that far exceeds the average number of scouts a Boy Scout troop would expect to produce.

 

The value of Jim’s experience can also be seen in the successes of a long line of scoutmasters in the troop who were able to “come up to speed” very quickly by tapping Jim’s corporate memory around troop operations and Boy Scout administrative procedures. During the time he has served as Troop Committee Chairman, Jim has worked with 5 different scoutmasters to help them fully assume their responsibilities as Scoutmaster.

Beyond his formal, long-standing role as Troop Committee Chairman, Jim also served as a key leader on 5 different Boy Scout High Adventure trips (2003 Northern Tier canoe trip, 2004 Philmont backpacking trip, 2005 Allagash canoe trip, 2006 Seabase Sailing trip, and 2008 Philmont backpacking trip). High Adventure trips are ambitious outdoor adventure trips designed to challenge older, more experienced scouts by introducing them to more physically and mentally demanding activities, usually in geographically remote locations. Because of this, the responsibilities of the adult leaders on these trips are significant. They include the need to meet the high physical demands of the trip; the need to make sound judgments in situations where access to outside help is limited; and the need to be prepared to handle medical emergencies that could arise during the trips. Being an adult leader on these trips requires a degree of personal commitment and confidence that goes well beyond what is required on a more routine “weekend campout”.

 

Finally, Jim has provided a consistently strong role model for the scouts in the troop. His organizational skills are legendary, even among those scouts who don’t at first understand why paying attention to detail is important, or who don’t really know how to effectively communicate to adults and others. The skills they learn from Jim’s example have a direct impact on their future ability to be successful in their jobs. While Jim sets a high standard for scouts in these areas, he also provides a model to scouts as a person who remains calm in the face of difficulty; respectful even in circumstances where there may be disagreement; and good-natured, even in the face of offensive or insensitive behavior. Through Jim, scouts can see how the tenets of the Boy Scout Law play out in real life in how a person should conduct himself.

 

Patti Schwartz began her career as a volunteer adult leader with the Boy Scouts of America 32 years ago when she became a Cub Scout Den Leader in Downington, PA. Over the next several years, Patti continued her service as a Cub Scout Den Leader, and subsequently as a Cub Scout Committee Chairwoman in Herndon, VA. Since 1996, Patti has been a member of Troop 89’s Troop Committee where she has taken on major responsibilities as the troop’s Good Turn Coordinator (the person who coordinates and organizes virtually all of the troop’s organized service activities), Advancement Chairperson (the person most directly responsible for monitoring, encouraging, and processing scout rank advancements at all levels), and Eagle Court of Honor Coordinator (the person directly responsible for organizing and coordinating Eagle Courts of Honor). From 1996 to the present, Patti has also served as a Merit Badge Councilor for Troop 89, and she has served as a volunteer adult Girl Scout Leader in Medfield.

 

During the time that Patti has been working as a volunteer leader in Troop 89, she has also volunteered her time supporting several other organizations and activities in Medfield. Of particular note, Patti has been active for many years in St. Edward’s Prayer Shawl Ministry as part of the “One Family Knitters” group. As a member of “One Family Knitters, Patti has also participated in St. Edward’s support of several charitable organizations knitting hats, scarves, baby sweaters and “premi” baby hats. She has also volunteered for numerous Special Olympics competitions in the area and has supported the Angel Run in Medfield for several years. Because of the breadth of activities Patti has been involved with here in Medfield; she has been able to create synergistic opportunities that tap the capabilities of one organization to serve the needs of other organizations. A good example of this is her volunteer work with the Medfield Food Cupboard where, in addition to providing direct personal support to the Food Cupboard, she has also used her position as the Good Turn Coordinator for Troop 89 to obtain help from scouts to stock the food cupboard, as well as to provide scouts who are working on the Cooking merit badge with the opportunity to bake pies at Thanksgiving in support of the Food Cupboard’s holiday support activities. In doing this, both organizations wound up achieving important goals of their programs.

 

It is well recognized in Medfield that the town’s Boy Scout program has been an important pillar supporting the development of Medfield’s youth into responsible adults and civic-minded citizens. Jim and Patti Schwartz have devoted an extraordinary amount of time to support Boy Scouts over decades, the last 23 years of which have been focused on supporting Boy Scouts in Medfield. Over all of that time, each of them has provided a stellar example of what it means to be a responsible, caring citizen.  Jim has demonstrated deep strength in both the “administrative” context of a troop committee working month in and month out to ensure that Troop 89 has a vibrant  scouting program, and as an  on-the-ground adult leader in multiple challenging high adventure settings where decisions, often made under pressure, can be anything but routine. Patti brings a caring, supportive disposition to Troop 89 that has made a huge difference in what numerous scouts have gotten out of scouting, as well as what they have achieved by way of rank advancement. While Troop 89’s success at developing scouts into Eagle Scouts is impressive as a troop accomplishment, it is safe to say that Patti has had a big hand in getting a significant number of scouts “across the finish line”; just by helping them see the possibility and get organized to realize it.

Perhaps the best summary expression of the contribution that Jim and Patti Schwartz have made to Medfield over the years is captured in the tribute that was paid to them at a Troop 89 troop meeting this past fall —

In Boy Scout troops we are fortunately often blessed with adult leaders who are willing to step up and accept the challenge of leading and inspiring groups of Boy Scouts over the course of their scouting careers. The task these adult leaders accept goes beyond merely administering the scouting program and guiding scouts through various rank and merit badge requirements. These adult leaders take on the challenge of modeling for scouts what they hope these scouts will become as they move through their scouting careers and mature into responsible, caring, honest, and competent adults.

Most of the time, these adult leaders are active in Boy Scouts while their own sons are Boy Scouts. Quite understandably, at the point that their sons have completed their time as Boy Scouts, these adult leaders move on to other chapters in their lives and other endeavors. On some rare occasions, however, an adult leader is motivated to remain committed to playing a leadership role beyond the time that his or her own son is a scout. On even rarer occasions, two adult leaders from the same family maintain this commitment and devote themselves to helping a large number of scouts mature into responsible adults. The experience level, insight, and the sterling quality of the role model they provide to scouts makes this rare occurrence invaluable to any troop that benefits from their involvement. Jim and Patti Schwartz have been that rare resource for Troop 89. Their patience with scouts during troop activities and rank advancement, along with their unfailing upbeat tone provide visible evidence that it is possible to be friendly, courteous, kind – and disciplined and thorough in getting things done. This lesson may have come more easily to some scouts than others, but it is a lesson that will serve all scouts well throughout their lives.

Jim and Patti, we salute both of you and will be ever grateful for the contribution you each have made to all of our scouts in Troop 89. Thank you so much for your steadfast commitment over these years and the lasting impact you have had on this troop!

 

For all the reasons cited above, I and the other leaders of Boy Scout Troop 89 strongly recommend Jim and Patti Schwartz as solid candidates for the Medfield Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement award.

Jean Mineo, Medfield Foundation 2017 volunteer of the year

Jean Mineo

Jean Mineo – 2017 Medfield Foundation Volunteer of the Year

Jean Mineo was selected as the 2017 Medfield Foundation volunteer of the year just last month by the judges.  Jean was nominated by both Chris McCue Potts and Minta Hissong, a first having the same person nominated more than once in one year.  Jean and all the remarkable eight other Medfield volunteers who were nominated this year will be celebrated at the reception next Sunday, March 19 at 3PM at The Center. The public is invited to attend.

Brothers Marketplace generously sponsored the 2017 Medfield Foundation volunteer awards and support was also received from the Rockland Trust Charitable Foundation.

Below in the order they were received are the nominations first by Chris McCue Potts, and then the one by Minta Hissong.


 

It is no secret that Jean Mineo is the “chief cultural Officer” for the town of Medfield — past, present and future! Her past work includes making possible innovative and visually interesting community art, including a sculpture trail at MSH site, power boxes painted with historical or other images relative to Medfield, and outdoor pianos for all to enjoy. Additionally, Jean founded the Cultural Alliance of Medfield so that the town would have an active cultural projects/events/advocacy organization to supplement the grant-making role of the Medfield Cultural Council. Her current work involves a number of initiatives, from making the vision of the Straw Hat Park and Holiday Stroll both a reality — and highly successful ones indeed evidenced by Town Meeting support for park funding, and the enormous turnout and positive feedback on the 2nd annual Stroll!  For both endeavors, Jean had to oversee all aspects — from fundraising, volunteer and partner recruitment, political navigation, logistical details, publicity and so much more.  Through it all, Jean always does it thoughtfully, with a calm and focused demeanor, and in a way that inspires others to get involved. Rarely does Jean get frustrated when confronted with a hurdle or challenge (which is sure to happen) — she just focuses on what needs to get done to keep things moving forward.

A hugely beneficial initiative that Jean led was the town matching initiative for Medfield Cultural Council funding for local nonprofits. For very little money (but big impact), Jean successfully made the case for the match, rallied residents to turn out for the Town Meeting vote (and speak up), and then played a role in making sure residents knew what kind of impact the doubling of available funding could have on local cultural groups and projects, including Zullo Gallery, Gazebo Players, Medfield Music Association, Medfield Public Library, and others.

Jean’s current efforts serving on the Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee, have the potential to provide future payoff with expansion of the town’s cultural offerings. She has spent countless hours pulling together local cultural groups and representatives who have a shared vision for the huge impact cultural initiatives/a cultural focus could have at the MSH site. Her work has required endless meetings, bringing in unpaid expertise for a visioning session, rallying the community to support the hiring of a paid consultant to conduct and report back on a feasibility study, and building relationships and navigating all levels of town politics, and the work is ongoing. Jean even launched an artistic competition for the creative reuse of the old waterworks gears from the MSH site!

Jean’s commitment to Medfield’s cultural vitality and overall town character, and the impact her time and energy has made on our community, is nothing short of amazing.

In terms of impact and results, consider this:

1) The thousands of people who have visited and enjoyed the Straw Hat Park so far…including all of the attractions that were in place prior to the official ribbon-cutting in the fall of 2016. This includes piano players, sidewalk chalk art viewers, and so many others wanting to envision the possibilities!

2) The thousands of people who have taken part in the Holiday Stroll for the past two years – whether volunteers, residents, out of town visitors, or artisans selling their works or providing services. The Stroll helped deepen the sense of community that is so strong in Medfield, and helped to lift so many spirits. The community-wide event also helps to support the livelihood of many artists, and also showcase Medfield’s own
artistic talents, including visual and musical.

3) The thousands of people who drive or walk by and appreciate all of the various community art Jean has made possible through the Art in Public Places initiative (via Medfield Foundation).

4) The tens of thousands of people who will benefit if MSH redevelopment includes one or more cultural components – this would include residents, visitors and contributing artists.

As a testament to Jean’s work as former head of the Medfield Cultural Council, the Massachusetts Cultural Council awarded her with a Leadership Circle Award in 2015, and the town recognized her contributions with a special event at the Zullo Gallery. https://www.mass-culture.org/lca_honorees.aspx

In addition to all of Jean’s cultural work, she served on the MAP board (including president) and has also been actively volunteering with community projects sponsored by United Church of Christ in Medfield (prior to and separate from working there).

Jean Mineo is long overdue for the Volunteer of the Year Award. Let’s make 2017 her year!

 


 

I am nominating Jean Mineo for the volunteer of the year award. Jean serves on many boards, organizations, and donates hours of her time to our town. I will focus on one of her big accomplishments of 2016, the Straw Hat Park. This park would not have been created but for Jean’s vision, drive, patience, knowledge and fortitude. I was lucky enough to be on the Straw Hat Park committee with Jean from the beginning when we first started meeting in December of 2013! Jean worked tirelessly from the beginning when in the summer of 2013 she started gathering ideas for the park with public art in the space. From there the selectman gave her permission to gather a team and see what could be done with the pocket park. Jean spent hours and hours on administration, attending meetings, meeting with key players in town, surveys, PR, social media guru, fundraising, speaking at town meetings, and finally working with the tradesman to get the work done. It was her project and she kept plugging away when politics and obstacles got in the way. I watched her work from behind the scenes and her dedication to our town is second to none. She always had a way to make it work. The Straw Hat Park is a beautiful new space in our town that is already getting a lot of use. This creation of this space from dirt/grass to our new park is because of Jean’s work and she deserves to be formally recognized. Thank you for the consideration.
-Minta Hissong

Nancy Irwin & Mary Pat McSharry, 2017 MFi volunteer award nominees

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Nancy Irwin & Mary Pat McSharry, 2017 MFi volunteer award nominees for “their” SWAP area

Nancy and Mary Pat were jointly nominated by Megan Sullivan, Chair of the town’s Transfer Station and Recycling Committee, for recognition by the Medfield Foundation volunteer awards for their work creating the current SWAP area at the Transfer Station. Nancy has been running the SWAP for eight years, Mary Pat for three and a half years.

This was Megan’s nomination of each:


 

Nancy Irwin should be Volunteer of the Year because of her tireless work at the SWAP area that benefits Medfield in many ways.

Nancy has done a wonderful job taking a dumping ground and turning it into a fully-functional swap/reuse area that is an example for other towns.

Since 2009 (or maybe 2010) Nancy has been working to make the swap area better and better. Before Nancy got involved, the SWAP area was a location where people dumped their cardboard boxes of belongings and people searched through them. At the end of the day, everything left was thrown away. With perseverance Nancy has steadily made improvements each yea r. In the first years volunteers would take things home at night and bring them back the next day so they might have another chance to be adopted by someone. And now we have a wonderful covered swap area where items are well organized for display, making them more likely to be taken home, and they can stay for up to 2 weeks. In addition, now when remaining items are moved out if they have not been adopted, Nancy and her crew of volunteers work very hard to make sure only the “truly trash” ends up on the tip floor and everything else is donated or recycled. Nancy has been the leading force behind these changes.

Nancy has worked hand in hand with the DPW to accomplish the changes at the SWAP. A few years ago Nancy joined the Transfer Station and Recycling Committee so the swap area is represented on this committee. She has been a dedicated member. The new tent and paving are the result of her requests to the DPW.

While Nancy has been a SWAP champion (aka Grand Poobah), there are many folks who volunteer to make the SWAP area run during the operating season. (I appreciate all of them too!) Nancy doesn’t hesitate to ask for help and has a great group of volunteers who make the whole area run. Her enthusiasm for the area is contagious. And now that the SWAP is well organized and well-run, new volunteers have come forward to help.

Keeping the volunteers and customers happy isn’t an easy job. Nancy hasn’t let the difficult conversations get in the way of making the SWAP a nice place for the community to gather and find a treasure and for the town to reduce the waste generated by offering an easy place for reuse.

More often than not from 9am – 4pm Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from May – October you will find Nancy Irwin at the SWAP area. She is a dedicated volunteer who generously donates her time to make the SWAP area a fun, pleasant and important place for Medfield and one that is key to reducing the amount of trash the town disposes of. I’ve heard from many folks that the SWAP is one of their favorite things about Medfield … and Nancy Irwin is to thank for that.

 


 

Mary Pat McSharry is an incredible volunteer for the SWAP area and for this reason I am nominating her for Volunteer of the Year. Mary Pat has been a partner with Nancy Irwin in the management of the SWAP area since September 2013. As Mary Pat explains, one afternoon she came by and dropped some items off and never left. Until that time she hadn’t even heard of the SWAP. And since then she’s been an amazing volunteer!

Mary Pat has been wonderful for the SWAP area. She is very creative and she is responsible for the logistics, the layout of the tent area and keeping things looking fresh. She is pleasant and helpful to people at the SWAP. In addition, her creativity shines through in the creations she makes from and suggests for items in the SWAP area. She’s always creating. The signs that indicate different areas in the SWAP area were made by Mary Pat from repurposed treasures. The new sign made from a headboard that is outside the mattress recycling container is one of Mary Pat’s. She heard of the need and offered to make the sign, repurposing something that was headed toward the trash and at the same time saving the Town the cost of purchasing a new sign.

Mary Pat has also personally donated supplies for the swap area. The tent that has been used for electronics the past 3 years was a personal donation. In addition, she has not (but should have!) asked for reimbursement for the supplies such as tape and lanyards that she has purchased to keep the swap area running smoothly. You can tell her heart is in the volunteer work she does for the SWAP. She would rather things be running properly than worry about who is paying for them.

Mary Pat is a tireless advocate for the SWAP and attends meetings of the Transfer Station and Recycling Committee when she can. She is committed to a well-running swap area and puts in the energy to make that happen.

More often than not from 9am – 4pm Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from May – October you will find Mary Pat McSharry at the SWAP area. Cold and rainy or in the middle of a heat wave, she is there.  She is a dedicated volunteer who generously donates her time to make the SWAP area a fun, pleasant and important place for Medfield and one that is key to reducing the amount of trash the town disposes of. Mary Pat McSharry is one of the dedicated volunteers to thank for that.

Linda Frawley, MFi volunteer awards nominee

Tracey Rogers nominated Linda Frawley for the 2017 Medfield Foundation volunteer awards mainly for her work with Girl Scouts, but also for her All Night Graduation Party (ANGP) and Medfield Coalition for Public Education (MCPE) service.

This was Tracey’s nomination:

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LINDA FRAWLEY

St. Francis would tell his disciples, “Preach the Gospel at all times and when necessary use words.”  I begin my nomination for Linda with this quote as I can think of no better way to convey her lead-by-example style and dedication to Medfield Girls Scouts (MGS) over her 13 year involvement.

During this period, Linda has served in many capacities.  Most notable was her six year tenure as Service Unit Manager where she was responsible for both the day-to-day operations and long-term planning for MGS.  Each year MGS typically encompasses nearly 400 girl scouts and their familes and over 75 adult troop leaders.  Additionally, Linda has served as a troop/patrol leader (12yrs), community service coordinator (3yrs), treasurer (3yrs), CORI coordinator (5yrs) and she has organized the following events – end of the year Bridging ceremony for Scouts (5yrs), the parent/volunteer appreciation dinner (3yrs), encampment for over 100 scouts (4yrs) and MGS’ 100th anniversary celebration in 2016.

As you can see, Linda is a doer.  No job is too big or too small for her.  Her efforts have increased awareness of the benefits of scouting to Medfield families and within the overall community.  This is why MGS is one of the largest and longest running service units in the Girls Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts’ organization.

Linda has taken the principles of a national organization that is steeped with tradition and shaped them into a relavent and vibrant LOCAL girl scout organization that meets the needs of girls ranging in the age from five to 17.  She accomplished this by developing a program that offers scouts a range of opportunities to grow as individuals and at their own pace as well as one that equally supports adult troop leaders working with scouts in the field.

But more importantly, Linda has made a true impact on the lives of the girl scouts themselves.  Even with all her managerial responsibilities, Linda maintained her role as patrol/troop leader for her daughter’s grade as she never lost sight of the importance of working directly with the girls and the significance of her time with her daughter, Hannah.  Under Linda’s guidance, 17 scouts in the Class of 2016 bridged to adults and eight of the scouts earned Gold Awards – the highest award a girl scout can attain.

The benefits of a strong and active MGS to the Medfield community are numerous.  MGS is an organization that is open and accessible to all Medfield girls. It is an organization that is collaborative and works to improve the common good.  For example, MGS is one of the largest supporters of the Medfield Food Cupboard, organizes the annual Spring clean-up at Wheelock fields, visits regulary at Upham House, Tilden and COA.  Linda’s work has built MGS into what it is today – an organization that Medfield non-profits have come to depend.  When she retired last year, she left in place an infrastructure and culture that will support MGS for many years.

When I think of Linda the following expressions come to the forefront – gets the job done, breath of fresh air, sigh of relief and tireless worker.  With these characteristics in mind, please accept my nomination of Linda Frawley for MFi’s Volunteer of the Year.  Given the longevity, scope and lasting results of her work in the Medfield community, she is truly the most befitting choice for this award this year.

The Trac(e)y’s – MFi volunteer awards nominees for the ANGP

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Tracy Fedak and Tracey Rogers

The Trac(e)y’s, Tracy Fedak and Tracey Rogers, were nominated for the Medfield Foundation volunteer awards by Ann Whitla for chairing the All Night Graduation Party (ANGP) for three years.

The Trac(e)y’s and all the other remarkable 2017 volunteer nominees will be feted and honored for their service to the town at the reception at 3 PM on March 19 at The Center.  The public is invited to attend and be inspired – come to hear the magical stories from the nine 2017 volunteers of what they have done, and leave amazed.

Brothers Marketplace is the generous sponsor of the 2017 Medfield Foundation Volunteer Awards, with support also from the Rockland Trust Charitable Foundation.

Below is Ann Whitla’s nomination of The Trac(e)y’s:


 

Representing an army of All Night Graduation Party volunteers who happily toil under
the brilliant leadership and tireless efforts of Tracy Fedak and Tracey Rogers, I enthusiastically nominate “The Trac(e)ys” for the Medfield Foundation’s Volunteer of the Year Award.

The All Night Graduation Party (ANGP), celebrating its 25th year in 2017, takes place at
Medfield High School from 9pm – Sam on graduation night and is one of the most highly anticipated traditions for Medfield graduates. Over 4,500 MHS seniors have celebrated their graduation at the ANGP and each year, 97% of the graduating class (200+ students) attend this extraordinary event. MHS is truly transformed for the ANGP, with 15 distinct areas of the school decorated in the spirit of that year’s theme. So complete is the transformation that students often forget they’re at school. Instead, they might enter the world of Harry Potter or Candy Land, or the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Beyond the phenomenal decorating, the party is buzzing all night long with activities to delight and entertain for eight full hours, from dancing and blackjack to jumping castles and magicians. At the ANGP, kids who have been together since kindergarten come together for one last joyous gathering – a festive farewell that requires a community of volunteers to pull off, and the leadership of The Trac(e)ys.

ACTION – what do the nominees actually do

2017 marks the third year Tracy Fedak and Tracey Rogers have co-chaired the ANGP, an eight hour event that requires nine months of planning and execution.

In 2016, work began even earlier, as The Trac(e)ys decided to participate in Medfield
Day to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the ANGP. Their award-winning booth raised
much needed funds and significantly raised awareness of the event within the greater
Medfield community.

Party planning begins in October, as The Trac(e)ys recruit captains to head up
decorating, fundraising, food and beverage, prizes and gifts, and chaperone
coordination. They also recruit the 100+ volunteers required to assist these captains.
They also oversee early stage meetings where the party theme is established and nine
month plans are put in place. Every decision is made with the graduating seniors in
mind – what will make it festive and fun and memorable for them.

Throughout, The Trac(e)ys also manage the enormous fundraising arm necessary to
pull off such a large scale event. The cost of the ANGP is typically $30,000-35,000, or
$150 per student – a bargain for an eight-hour non-stop extravaganza. The ANGP
receives no funding from the school and, while much of the funding comes through
contributions by graduates’ families, all contributions are voluntary. The party is open to all graduates regardless of their ability to contribute. The ANGP Fashion Show (another tradition, where senior students model the latest prom fashions), a solicitation mailing to all Medfield residents, and a one-day fundraiser at Roche Brothers provide additional funds, all managed by The Trac(e)ys. The Trac(e)ys’ fundraising efforts mean that every year they’re able to break even.

In January and February, The Trac(e)ys meet with the decorating captains  (one-on-one and at larger meetings) to ensure all the captains understand the theme and have a plan for their designated area. They brainstorm the design, needed materials, and how to display the theme in the best possible way, while still allowing for the safe movement of kids in each room. January is also the time when The Trac(e)ys work with the Fashion Show co-chairs to begin planning that event.
Every Wednesday night, from the first of March through graduation, The Trac(e)ys host decorating workshops, assisting the decorating captains and their teams of volunteers to help bring their artistic vision to life. The Trac(e)ys purchase supplies, coordinate collections of craft materials, and all the while, behind the scenes, continue to head up fundraising, safety, banking, prize and gift purchasing, chaperone recruitment, and record keeping.

And then the party weekend arrives. The Trac(e)ys coordinate the transformation of a school into a party in just a matter of hours. The school is turned over to the ANGP at 3pm on Friday. The Trac(e)ys lead the 100+ volunteers who work into the night (and often into Saturday morning), installing the elaborate decorations and setting up food stations and entertainment venues. Everything must be completed by Saturday, when the Fire and Police Chiefs come through to perform their inspections. Saturday afternoon The Trac(e)ys play host to the Medfield public, who are invited to tour and admire the amazing display (if you haven’t yet done this, I encourage you to go – you will be blown away!). The Trac(e)ys host another tour, for the graduates’ families, following graduation on Sunday afternoon. Graduates themselves are not allowed in ahead of the party – the theme and decorations are a closely guarded secret.

During the event itself, The Trac(e)ys oversee all aspects of the party. They manage the arrival and display of food and beverages (with multiple vendors providing a  variety of food choices, staggered throughout the night). Each student leaves the party with several gifts and prizes (typically dorm room items), which have been coordinated, shopped for and delivered to the school by another host of volunteers,  under the direction of The Trac(e)ys. They also oversee the Volunteer Chairs, who coordinate the staffing of chaperones across three different time slots. When the party ends at Sam, another team of volunteers comes in to disassemble and clean the entire space. Just two hours later, at ?am, undergraduates arrive for Monday morning classes.

Following the party, The Trac(e)ys catalog and store all reusable decorations and
supplies, conduct follow up meetings and surveys to collect feedback for the following
year, and wrap up the financial paperwork.

NEED – what community need do they address

The ANGP provides Medfield’s graduates with a phenomenal, inclusive, memorable, safe, and drug and alcohol-free evening – with nearly 100% participation. In fact, the Medfield ANGP is so good that The Trac(e)ys often host visits by other school committees looking to emulate Medfield’s success.

In the words of Police Chief Meaney, “In many communities, graduation night is a night when you hope that nothing bad happens. Unfortunately, having hope about anything is very nice but it is not a plan to deal with a situation. In Medfield, we have a positive event for each Medfield High School graduate to attend. That is what the All Night Graduation Party accomplishes with style and surprise each year. I went to several as a parent and I have attended each one since 2006 as Chief. The best part is watching the expression on the faces of the new alumni as they walk into a building that has been transformed. The number of young people who I watch and listen to each year as they come up to parent volunteers and sincerely thank them for their efforts is remarkable. You know you have filled a need when you see the expression on their faces. It is always the best part of the night for me.”

IMPACT – how does their work make a difference

The Medfield community comes together to ensure our children are well-cared for on a night that could otherwise go disastrously wrong. It’s an opportunity for parents and
friends of graduating seniors to give their children one last wonderful gift before leaving.

Again, Chief Meaney writes, “As far as impact, the record will show that nearly all the
graduates show up that night. Some of these young adults have been together since pre-K and this will be the last time that they are all together in one place. They don’t want to miss it. I rest much easier that night knowing where most of the graduating class is. There is a lot of supervision that night but you really don’t see the graduates’ fun being the least bit crushed. They have a brilliant time. All you have to do is be there for a couple hours to understand the positive impact of this night.”

INSPIRE – in what ways do they inspire others to contribute

From several ANGP volunteers inspired by the work and leadership of The Trac(e)ys:

“The Trac(e)ys exude enthusiasm, high energy, and fun, which is how they recruit the 100+ volunteers required for this event. For months, they roll up their sleeves and keep the laughs coming. They lead, they manage, they oversee – but by all means, they work, right alongside every other volunteer, to make every ANGP the best it can be. Volunteers are motivated to do their best because of the passion and commitment of The Trac(e)ys, and we have a great time along the way, enjoying the preparations as
much as the graduating seniors enjoy the party itself.”

“The Trac(e)ys together make an incredible team. Both have competencies that play off each other and allow them to successfully create and lead a huge team of volunteers to a truly fabulous result. Tracy Fedak has boundless energy and an artistic eye. Tracey Rogers is detail oriented, organized and works behind the scenes diligently to manage the administrative process. They bring out the best in each other as well as the best in everyone else. They inspire all of us to contribute, to work hard, and to have fun.”

“It seems a natural fit that Tracey Rogers and Tracy Fedak would take the reins as ANGP co-chairs. Both are born hostesses with a great knack for entertaining and hospitality. Oftentimes, Tracey and Tracy open their homes for ANGP committee and decorating meetings, putting out a spread of food and drink and making everyone feel welcome. Remarkably, they pulled off one of the most amazingly decorated ANGPs for a large class that included their own children. That gift of time and dedication speaks volumes.”

And finally, from Robert Parga, Principal of Medfield High School:

“The All-Night Grad Party is an event that our seniors look forward to each year. It’s an opportunity for them to celebrate one last time as a class and to share memories and reflect on their time as students in the Medfield Public Schools. Most importantly, the event provides a safe and supportive social environment for the graduates. I have always been amazed at the amount of work that goes into putting that whole night together. Tracy Fedak and Tracey Rodgers have spent countless hours over the past several years volunteering their time to the Medfield High School community. What
they have done with the ANGP is above and beyond what any school could ask for. They are creating memories for our students and their efforts are to be applauded.”

POST SCRIPT:

As if their work co-chairing the ANGP isn’t enough, The Trac(e)ys donate their time in other ways as well. Tracy Fedak joined the Blake PTO as co-president shortly after moving to Medfield and performs volunteer work at her church.

Tracey Rogers has been very active in Girl Scouts, is co-vice president at the Medfield Food Cupboard, ran the Rocky Woods Feast at Wheelock as well as the Teacher Appreciation Luncheon at Blake.

Thank you for your consideration of this nomination. For any additional information, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Ann Whitla
419 Main Street
Medfield
617-763-8775
ann.humphrey@gmail.com