Category Archives: Teens

Mental health referral service

The William James Interface Referral Service

The School Department and the town signed up with The William James Interface Referral Service, which is a mental health referral service for any resident.  Interface phones are answered by mental health professionals, and they match callers with appropriate clinical staff.  Interface does the legwork, and makes referrals based on the variables. The service became available for Medfield residents November 1.  See the Interface website for other resources – William James Interface Referral Service
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Screen time and depression correlate

Author Jean Twenge Professor of Psychology, San Diego State University Academic rigor, journalistic flair Around 2012, something started going wrong in the lives of teens. In just the five years between 2010 and 2015, the number of U.S. teens who felt useless and joyless – classic symptoms of depression – surged 33 percent in large national surveys. Teen suicide attempts increased 23 percent. Even more troubling, the number of 13- to 18-year-olds who committed suicide jumped 31 percent. In a new paper published in Clinical Psychological Science, my colleagues and I found that the increases in depression, suicide attempts and suicide appeared among teens from every background – more privileged and less privileged, across all races and ethnicities and in every region of the country. All told, our analysis found that the generation of teens I call “iGen” – those born after 1995 – is much more likely to experience mental health issues than pimchawee November 14, 2017 9.36am EST With teen mental health deteriorating over five years, there's a likely culprit https://theconversation.com/with-teen-mental-health-deteriorating-over-f... 1 of 3 11/24/2017, 4:21 PM their millennial predecessors. What happened so that so many more teens, in such a short period of time, would feel depressed, attempt suicide and commit suicide? After scouring several large surveys of teens for clues, I found that all of the possibilities traced back to a major change in teens’ lives: the sudden ascendance of the smartphone. All signs point to the screen Because the years between 2010 to 2015 were a period of steady economic growth and falling unemployment, it’s unlikely that economic malaise was a factor. Income inequality was (and still is) an issue, but it didn’t suddenly appear in the early 2010s: This gap between the rich and poor had been widening for decades. We found that the time teens spent on homework barely budged between 2010 and 2015, effectively ruling out academic pressure as a cause. However, according to the Pew Research Center, smartphone ownership crossed the 50 percent threshold in late 2012 – right when teen depression and suicide began to increase. By 2015, 73 percent of teens had access to a smartphone. Not only did smartphone use and depression increase in tandem, but time spent online was linked to mental health issues across two different data sets. We found that teens who spent five or more hours a day online were 71 percent more likely than those who spent less than an hour a day to have at least one suicide risk factor (depression, thinking about suicide, making a suicide plan or attempting suicide). Overall, suicide risk factors rose significantly after two or more hours a day of time online. Of course, it’s possible that instead of time online causing depression, depression causes more time online. But three other studies show that is unlikely (at least, when viewed through social media use). Two followed people over time, with both studies finding that spending more time on social media led to unhappiness, while unhappiness did not lead to more social media use. A third randomly assigned participants to give up Facebook for a week versus continuing their usual use. Those who avoided Facebook reported feeling less depressed at the end of the week. The argument that depression might cause people to spend more time online doesn’t also explain why depression increased so suddenly after 2012. Under that scenario, more teens became depressed for an unknown reason and then started buying smartphones, which doesn’t seem too logical. What’s lost when we’re plugged in Even if online time doesn’t directly harm mental health, it could still adversely affect it in indirect ways, especially if time online crowds out time for other activities. With teen mental health deteriorating over five years, there's a likely culprit https://theconversation.com/with-teen-mental-health-deteriorating-over-f... 2 of 3 11/24/2017, 4:21 PM Mental health Suicide Depression Generations Smartphones Friendship Screen time teen depression Teens For example, while conducting research for my book on iGen, I found that teens now spend much less time interacting with their friends in person. Interacting with people face to face is one of the deepest wellsprings of human happiness; without it, our moods start to suffer and depression often follows. Feeling socially isolated is also one of the major risk factors for suicide. We found that teens who spent more time than average online and less time than average with friends in person were the most likely to be depressed. Since 2012, that’s what has occurred en masse: Teens have spent less time on activities known to benefit mental health (in-person social interaction) and more time on activities that may harm it (time online). Teens are also sleeping less, and teens who spend more time on their phones are more likely to not be getting enough sleep. Not sleeping enough is a major risk factor for depression, so if smartphones are causing less sleep, that alone could explain why depression and suicide increased so suddenly. Depression and suicide have many causes: Genetic predisposition, family environments, bullying and trauma can all play a role. Some teens would experience mental health problems no matter what era they lived in. But some vulnerable teens who would otherwise not have had mental health issues may have slipped into depression due to too much screen time, not enough face-to-face social interaction, inadequate sleep or a combination of all three. It might be argued that it’s too soon to recommend less screen time, given that the research isn’t completely definitive. However, the downside to limiting screen time – say, to two hours a day or less – is minimal. In contrast, the downside to doing nothing – given the possible consequences of depression and suicide – seems, to me, quite high. It’s not too early to think about limiting screen time; let’s hope it’s not too late. With teen mental health deteriorating over five years, there's a likely culprit https://theconversation.com/with-teen-mental-health-deteriorating-over-f... 3 of 3 11/24/2017, 4:21 PMWith teen mental health deteriorating over five years, there's a likely culprit_Page_2With teen mental health deteriorating over five years, there's a likely culprit_Page_3

MetroWest Adolescent Health Survey Report

MHS sigh

The full MetroWest Adolescent Health Survey Report has been put on-line by the schools.  I am not sure if this is the first year the full report has been made available, as I know in the past only summaries were distributed.  Great to see the actual data.

A few things I noticed from scanning it:

  • fair amount of alcohol and marijuana use
  • lots and lots of stress
  • some pressured to provide sex
  • few parents control and/or discuss on-line use and time

http://medfield.net/district-information/mwahs.html

I was interested to learn at a recent Medfield Cares About Prevention (MCAP) (www.MedfieldCares.org) meeting that the kids generally do not believe the data about alcohol and drug use affecting their brains, based on their push back to Dr. Ruth Potee when she was presenting the facts to them at her recent talk at Medfield High School.

Medfield Coalition for Suicide Prevention

Medfield sign

The Medfield Coalition for Suicide Prevention, is a newly formed steering-committee (created September 2017) of community members/professionals who desire to create a coalition that promotes mental health resources.  We recognize that a public health crisis has touched our town and by coming together, we can form an initiative that raises awareness and has the potential to save lives . The MCSP has created this GoFundMe account in order to raise funds that will:

  • hire a consultant to effectively guide our development of a strategic plan for suicide prevention among all ages in Medfield
  • create and disseminate printed resources
  • fund future QPR trainings
[The Medfield Coalition for Suicide Prevention is a program of Medfield Cares About Prevention (MCAP).]
Funds raised will benefit:
Medfield Foundation, Inc.

  Certified Charity
Medfield, MA

Interface is live

Interface, the mental health referral service brought to town by the combined efforts of the schools and police is now operational, and residents can get services.

Interface

The following is from the Superintendent’s blog  –

This post will highlight our new partnership with Interface Referral Service

Medfield Public Schools and Town of Medfield Collaborate to Fund Interface

 

We are pleased to announce a new referral service for all students and residents of Medfield. The Medfield Public Schools and the Town of Medfield have teamed up with William James College to provide a referral service that provides a wide range of valuable resources related to mental health and wellness for the benefit of children, adults and families, as well as educators and mental health professionals.

In addition to the resources on their website, the William James Interface Referral Service maintains a mental health and wellness referral helpline Monday through Friday, 9 am-5 pm, at 888-244-6843 (toll free). This is a free, confidential referral service for individuals across the lifespan living in Medfield. Callers are matched with licensed mental health providers from their extensive database. Each referral meets the location, insurance, and specialty needs of the caller. More information about the service and terms of confidentiality can be found here on the new Interface- Medfield page.

 

Angel Run – Last Chance Early Bird Registration

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Last Chance for Early-Bird Registration

Don’t be scared – there’s still time to register for the 2017 MFi Angel Run. Early-Bird registration closes tonight at Midnight!

not too late kid face

It’s not too late – register today!

If you haven’t registered yet, you have until Midnight tonight. Register now while the Angel Run shirt is still included and before the price goes up.
Race Information

  • Date: Sunday December 3, 2017
  • Time: 12:30pm
  • Location: Medfield High School
  • Cost: $25 per person which includes the Angel Run shirt – through today only

If you miss the deadline today, you can still register online before the race for $30 per person though we are sorry that doesn’t include a shirt. Don’t miss out!

Donate $50 with your registration and you can put a special message on the back of the Angel Run shirt. Your donation helps support Medfield residents in need.

needham-bank

Needham Bank is the Exclusive Presenting Sponsor of the 2017 MFi Angel Run

 

Copyright © 2017 Medfield Foundation, All rights reserved.
You registered for the Medfield Foundation Angel Run

Our mailing address is:

Medfield Foundation

Medfield Town House

459 Main Street

Medfield, MA 02052

 

Only A Few Days Left to Register for the 2017 Angel Run

angel-run-2016

Registration Closes Wednesday 11/1

To those of you who have already registered, thank you! We look forward to seeing you on December 3rd at 12:30pm.

To those of you who haven’t registered yet, don’t miss out on your chance to register for the 2017 MFi Angel Run. Early bird registration closes at midnight on November 1st. Register now before the price goes up and so you still get the famous Angel Run shirt.

 

Register Now

 

 

Donate $50 with your registration and you can put a special message on the back of the Angel Run shirt. Your donation helps support Medfield residents in need.
needham-bank

Needham Bank is the Exclusive Presenting Sponsor of the 2017 MFi Angel Run

 

 

P.S. The advertisement that ran on Thursday in the Hometown Weekly was run incorrectly. The race is on December 3, 2017 at 12:30pm. The deadline to register is 11/1. We apologize for any confusion.

 

 

Copyright © 2017 Medfield Foundation, All rights reserved.
You registered for the Medfield Foundation Angel Run

Our mailing address is:

Medfield Foundation

Medfield Town House

459 Main Street

Medfield, MA 02052
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