Category Archives: Teens

MHS Jazz at Lovell’s & Blue Moon this weekend

mhs-jazz-band

MHS Jazz at Lovell’s & Blue Moon this weekend

 

The jazz will be flowing from the greenhouse and bakery!  Take a break from holiday craziness and cold temps, and stop into the colorful greenhouse at Lovell’s Nursery on Saturday, Dec. 10, or take in the warmth and great aromas at Blue Moon on Sunday, Dec. 11, to hear some music from members of MHS Jazz Band!  The students will be fundraising for their trip to Cuba in April. All donations are welcome; checks should be made payable to Medfield Music Association (receipts available on site).

 

Lovell’s Nursery (greenhouse) w/hot cocoa & candy canes!

Saturday, Dec. 10 – 1:30 to 3 p.m.

 

MHS Jazz performers:

Francis Brooke

Brigitte Cronin

Dana Cruickshank

Micah Grinnell

Nolan Melia

Joe Pagliazzo

Justin Plakias

Brendan Tormey

Jack Wagenseller

 

Blue Moon

Sunday, Dec. 11 – 9:30-10:30 a.m.

 

MHS Jazz performers:

Melanie Baime

Gavin Connolly

Julie Han

Kyle Infantino

Patrick O’Connor

Dan Stromland

Brendan Tormeymhs-jazz-bandmhs-jazz-bandmhs-jazz-band

2016 Angel Run race results

 

Angel Run race results
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 angel-run-2016

The Results are In!

What a difference 24 hours makes. Natasha was surely smiling down on all of us yesterday for the 11th annual Angel Run. It was a beautiful day and another very successful event. Thank you to everyone that volunteered, donated or participated.

A proper thank you will be coming out soon but for now we have received a number of requests for how to find out finish times. You can view your time on Cool Running.

We will be sending out more information on how to get copies of photos and more. If you haven’t already done so, we ask that you Like us on Facebook and Follow us on Twitter so you can get important updates. So for now, on behlaf of the Medfield Foundation, thank you!

 

See Race Results

 

 

Copyright © 2016 Medfield Foundation, All rights reserved.
You registered for one of the many MFi Angel Run events

Our mailing address is:

Medfield Foundation

Medfield Town House

459 Main Street

Medfield, MA 02052
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Angel Run – noon tomorrow

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Don’t Miss the Angel Run!

There’s Joy to share,

An event to remember:

Get your bells and your bib

Wear your Wings, your Antlers or Holiday gear

It’s that Festive Time of Year!

There will be hot cocoa and Christmas Carols

Beautiful Bells and Jazz Ensembles.

You can walk or you can run

For 5K or ‘til you’re done.

Bring the kids, the dogs and Gran,

Call your friends and make a plan.

For Charity and for Fun –

This Sunday,

It’s the Angel Run!

 

Leanne LaBelle 2016

 

Join Us!  December 4, 2016 at 12:00pm

www.MedfieldFoundation.org

Veterans Day Breakfast – Wow!

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The Medfield veterans were poignantly honored on Veterans Day with the now annual Veterans Day Breakfast at The Center, thanks to soon to retire Veteran Service Officer Ron Griffin, which included entertainment by the Singing Trooper, Dan Clark, in the bottom photo.  Dan Clark is one great, professional, polished show, that would be well worth viewing the show on Medfield TV (click here).

All Viet Nam veterans were thanked and honored by a reception line composed of ten town officials for their service with a Presidential Proclamation, a pin, and a sticker, as part of the 50th year celebration of the Viet Nam War era veterans – about forty Viet Nam veterans were specially honored.

Service to the veterans was provided by the students from the Medfield High School group Warriors for the Warriors, seen standing in the top photo.

Please vote “NO” on legal marijuana

Reasons legal marijuana is not good:

  • Marijuana’s long-term negative impact on youth. Use by adolescents can impair brain development, reduce academic success, and lower IQ. Marijuana is also associated with susceptibility to long-term mental health issues (e.g., paranoia, depression, suicidal thoughts, and schizophrenia) and heart attacks.3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10
  • Marijuana can be addictive. The earlier someone begins using marijuana, the higher their risk of addiction –one in six users who start under age 18 become dependent; 25-50% of teen heavy users become addicted.1
  • Marijuana’s potency is greater than in the 1970s. Marijuana products available today range from 5% to85% THC (the psychoactive part of marijuana). This includes edibles (candies, cookies, sodas). Highly concentrated marijuana is more likely to be associated with addiction and the negative health consequences in young people seen in recent years.2
  • Marijuana dependency is associated with addiction to other drugs. In a prospective study, marijuana use was linked to a 6.2 times higher risk of developing a substance use disorder. The younger marijuana is used, the higher the rates of addiction to marijuana and to other drugs, including opioids.11,12
  • Where marijuana is legal, young people are more likely to use it. Since becoming the first state to legalize, Colorado has also become the #1 state in the nation for teen marijuana use. Teen use jumped 20% in Colorado in the two years since legalization, even as that rate has declined nationally.13,14, 17
  • Colorado saw a 49% increase in marijuana-related emergency room visits during the two years after marijuana was legalized (2013-14) compared with the prior two years. 14, 15, 16, 17
  • Increased accidental marijuana use by young children. Marijuana infused products such as gummy bears, candy bars and “cannabis cola” are often indistinguishable from traditional products and attractive to children, placing them at significant risk of accidental use. 14,16, 17

Footnotes:

1Comparative Epidemiology of Dependence on Tobacco, Alcohol, Controlled Substances, and Inhalants: Basic Findings From the National Comorbidity Survey,”
Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, 1994;

2Potency trends of Δ9-THC and other cannabinoids in confiscated cannabis preparations from 1993 to 2008. J Forensic Sci., 2010.

3Persistent cannabis users show neuropsychological decline from childhood to midlife. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A., 2012.

4“Impact of adolescent marijuana use on intelligence: Results from two longitudinal twin studies,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America;

5Cannabis use and depression: a longitudinal study of a national cohort of Swedish conscripts. BMC Psychiatry, 2012.

6Marijuana Use and High School Dropout: The Influence of Unobservables. Health Econ., 2010.

7Proportion of patients in south London with first-episode psychosis attributable to use of high potency cannabis: a case-control study. The Lancet Psychiatry, 2015.

8Daily use, especially of high-potency cannabis, drives the earlier onset of psychosis in cannabis users. Schizophrenia Bulletin., 2014.

9Marijuana use in the immediate 5-year premorbid period is associated with increased risk of onset of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. Schizophrenia
Research, 2015.

10Adverse cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular effects of marijuana inhalation: what cardiologists need to know. Am J Cardiol.,
2014.

11Cannabis Use and Risk of Psychiatric Disorders: Prospective Evidence From a US National Longitudinal Study. JAMA Psychiatry, 2016.

12Young adult sequelae of adolescent cannabis use: an integrative analysis. 2014.

13“20 percent increase in youth marijuana use,” WSAV, 1/13/2016; SAMHSA National Survey on Drug Use and Health, December 17, 2015;

14“The Legalization of marijuana in Colorado: The Impact,” Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, September 2015.

15“Marijuana Tourism and Emergency Department Visits in Colorado,” The New England Journal of Medicine, 2/25/2016.

16The Implications of Marijuana Legalization in Colorado. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2015.

17“The Legalization of marijuana in Colorado: The Impact,” Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, Vol. 4, September 2016.

www.mapreventionalliance.org

MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION: What Does Ballot Question 4 Mean?

  • Sets no limits on potency of marijuana products. Ballot question 4 specifically authorizes marijuana edibles (products like candy bars, gummy bears, “cannabis cola,” etc.), oils and concentrates.
  • Severely limits municipalities’ (and the state’s) ability to limit the nature and presence of the marijuana industry in their communities. Ballot question 4 potentially invalidates any state or local rule deemed “unreasonably impracticable.” Municipality must allow marijuana retail businesses in an amount at least 20% of the number of alcohol package stores – unless voters pass an ordinance or bylaw by majority vote. 94G, s. 3(a)(2)(ii).
  • Sets no limit on the number of stores that can sell marijuana statewide or number of operations to grow or manufacture marijuana and marijuana products. As written, ballot question 4 prohibits communities from enacting meaningful numerical caps on the number of marijuana stores (or types of marijuana businesses) except if explicitly authorized by special city/town referendum.
  • Mandates that communities must allow retail marijuana stores to open in any “area” that already has a medical marijuana dispensary. Additionally, it grants existing medical marijuana facilities the right to enter the recreational market at the same location—i.e. convert their dispensary into a “pot shop.” If ballot initiative is enacted in November, then any existing or future medical dispensary is guaranteed cultivation, manufacturing and retail licenses for recreational sales until a 75 quota is reached. Ballot initiative SECTION 10 and 11.
  • Bars communities from restricting “home grows.”
  • Sets the tax rate very low, meaning little or no net revenue benefit. Ballot question 4, prohibits host agreements that require marijuana businesses to pay anything over and above whatever costs are directly attributable to their operation. This would limit the amount of money a community could collect from “pot shops”.
  • No protections against drugged driving. Evidence shows that marijuana use impairs driving but there is no standard test to clearly identify a person under the influence of marijuana.
  • No provisions for data collection and research. This would limit the ability of Massachusetts to determine the impact of commercialization of recreational marijuana on our communities and our state without significant costs to taxpayers.

**Commercialization of marijuana will result in increased access to marijuana by our young people. This coupled with decreased perception of harm associated with marijuana use as a result of the “normalization” of marijuana products, including candies, cookies, and sodas, will increase the likelihood that MA adolescents will use marijuana.**

Sources: “What legal marijuana in Mass. would mean for your town,” Boston.com, 4/22/2016; “Medical pot dispensaries get first crack at licenses, exemptions under referendum,” CommonWealth, 5/24/2016; http://www.mass.gov/ago/docs/government/2015-petitions/15-27.pdf
www.mapreventionalliance.org

MFi Angel Run

angel-run-2016

Only 5 days left to register – don’t miss out!

View this email in your browser

Registration Closes Tuesday 11/1

To those of you who have already registered, thank you! We look forward to seeing you on December 4th at 12:00 noon.

To those of you who haven’t registered yet, don’t miss out on your chance to register for the 2016 MFi Angel Run. Early bird registration closes at midnight on November 1st. Register now before the price goes up and so you still get the famous Angel Run shirt.

 

Register Now

 

 

Donate $50 with your registration and you can put a special message on the back of the Angel Run shirt. Your donation helps support Medfield residents in need.
Needham Bank is the Exclusive Presenting Sponsor of the 2016 MFi Angel Run

 

 

 

Copyright © 2016 Medfield Foundation, All rights reserved.
You registered for the 2014 MFi Angel Run

Our mailing address is:

Medfield Foundation

Medfield Town House

459 Main Street

Medfield, MA 02052
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GSA collecting food & youth clothing Saturday 10-12 at UCC

March 4, 2016 Osler Peterson Medfield Town Selectman Medfield Town Hall 459 Main Street Medfield. MA 02052 Dear Selectman Peterson, GIRL SCOUTS It's that time of year again in Medfield! We are honoring an incredible number of Girl Scout Gold Award Recipients - seven! With over 40% of our 12th Grade Scouts being Gold Award Recipients, Medfield Girl Scouts ranks well above the national average of 5% - a very special distinction. In addition to recognizing these remarkable Scouts, seventeen of our 12th Grade Ambassador Scouts will be concluding their thirteen years of Girl Scouting and bridging to Adult Girl Scouts. Of additional note is that 9 of our 17 Ambassador Scouts have also earned various Girl Scout National Leadership Awards. Finally, we are very pleased to be celebrating 100 years of Girl Scouting in Medfield. We arc one of the oldest Service Units in the country. Enclosed is a detailed description of each Scout's Gold Award project for your perusal. These seven Girl Scouts join an elite group of young women who are respected throughout the world for their dedication, leadership, and concern for their community. As you can see, we have a lot to commemorate and we hope you can join us Saturday. March 19th at 1:00 PM with a reception directly following the ceremony. This year the ceremony will be held at St. Edward Church at 133 Spring Street in Medfield. We invite you to arrive by 12:30 to be a part of our opening ceremony and walk in with the other dignitaries. I will call your office in the next few days to see if it is possible for you to attend this very special event. Thanking you in advance for your attention to this matter, I remain with kind regards, Sincerely, Medfield Girl Scouts Gold Award Ceremony Committee Chair kcsteeger.a .comcast.net - 617-640-3277 - (c) MAR 1 4 2H6 About the Medfield Girl Scouts 2016 Gold Award Projects The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award available in Girl Scouting and is only earned by Girl Scouts who demonstrate an exceptional commitment to their communities and an outstanding dedication to achievement. In order to earn the Girl Scout Gold Award, Scouts must first complete a series of prerequisites that take anywhere from 18 months to two years to complete. These pre-requisites are designed to give the Girl Scouts experiences in goal setting, leadership, career exploration and community service. Once the prerequisites are completed, each girl submits a plan for her Girl Scout Gold Award project that will require a minimum of 85 hours to complete. Each project needs to combine the skills and passions of the candidate in unique ways so that once completed, her project will leave a lasting mark on the community. Katherine Lyons My project addressed the issue surrounding the lack of knowledge of how poverty affects kids living on Cape Cod. Before beginning my project, even I was unaware of the severe poverty that affects many people living on the Cape and my goal was to make as many people aware of the issue in my hometown and surrounding areas as possible. I hope the awareness raised through my project benefits not only those who are Jiving in poverty, hopefully through increased donations and support, but by raising awareness to the fact that not all poverty is right before our eyes. I was able to put together 30 new backpacks filled with brand new school supplies and a few hundred books with bookmarks made by the kids at the Medfield Afterschool Program that were delivered over the summer and in the fall to Chatham Elementary School. My project also involved organizing the Cradles to Crayons 'Give Back with an Outfit Pack' drive within Medfield Girl Scouts. We were able to create 27 complete packs, 5 partially filled packs, 2 bags of additional items and had a total impact of 37 kids. Emily Piersiak My project addressed the issue of the absence of safe crossing at the end of Baker Pond in Medfield, and the Jack of encouragement for young women in the STEM fields. With the help of Girl Scout Troop 74900 and other members of the community, I constructed a bridge to span the runoff at Baker Pond. The project also included a class I taught at the Medfield Public Library, in which I was able to share my interest and knowledge in structural engineering and bridges. I am very pleased with the outcome of my project, especially the completed bridge and the information I imparted on all of the children who attended my classes. I would like to thank everyone who helped me complete this project, whether it was by donating materials or by physically helping to build it. I appreciate all of the help from my wonderful community, and I hope people enjoy all aspects of my project for years to come. Eliza beth Raine For Gold Award Project, Bats for a Cause, I addressed the decline of the local bat population due to human impact. I specifically designed this project not only to attempt to bolster the bat population for the purpose of offsetting human impact on the bats' local environment, but also to educate the public to the benefits of helping bats. I posted four bat boxes at the Trustees of Reservations as a refuge for migrating bats which would serve as nurseries for their newborn pups. My hope was that a growing bat population could help to regulate the recent overpopulation of mosquitoes, which may transmit harmful viruses to humans, like Triple E. Since the bats would stop the mosquitoes from transmitting those viruses, helping the bat population would ultimately benefit human healthcare. I also decided to educate the public about bats from around the world in order to dispel human fear of bats. I planned and executed presentations to various audiences in the community during Medfield Day, at MAP at Wheelock and Dale Street Schools, free time at Medfield's Council on Aging, and at Stony Brook's Earth Day Celebration. -OverZoe Smith Volunteering is something I value. It is a big pa rt of my life. For tunately, I had a program like Girl Scouts to start me on an early path of volunteerism. However, not everyone has t his type of opportunity. My goal for my Gold Award was to share my passion for volunteering in order to better my community. With this goal in mind, I chose to work with middle school students in my town to offer them diffe re nt opportunities to give back to the community in hopes of insti lling in them a passion to volunteer. I acted as a lia ison, connecting students with local volunteer organizations. Strong relations hips formed quickly. Many students are now volunteering regularly. Last ly, in order to receive their deserved recognition, students will have the chance to earn a President's Volunteer Service Award (PVSA). The PVSA recognizes citizens for bettering the coun try by volunteering. By working with middle school students, I was able to establish a genuine passion for volunteering which they can continue to pursue throughout their lives. Grace Sowyrda My Gold Award project addressed the issue of the lack of poetry programs and creative outlets in school, particularly in my town of Medfield. Poetry is a positive vehicle for connecting with others through raw emotion. It has universal themes that inspire others in the message that we are not alone in our feelings. I saw a need to provide this type of creative outlet. I addressed this issue by creating an after school poetry program at Blake Middle School to provide a safe and fun place for teens to connect and learn about poetry. I also created a poetry hour program at the library where I read poetry to the children a nd did a creative craft. To connect the town, I led an all age poetry reading at the Medfie ld Public Library and also led a poetry reading at the Senior Center. To support my efforts, I created a poetry website with easy ways for teachers to incorporate poetry into the ir curriculums. With each event, I was amazed to see poetry work its magic in connecting all the pa rticipants. Poetry is a very important part of my life and I am so lucky to have had the privilege to share its beauty and power with so many wonderful people . . Julia Steeger My project, "Co nn ecting Kids Who Have with Kids Who Need': addressed the issue of poverty a nd the many ways poverty affects children. It was the SOth anniversary of the "War on Poverty" launched by President Johnson that gave me the idea. Even with 50 years of effort, 15% of our state's chi ldren continue to live in poverty. I created my Gold Award project to educate kids in Medfield about how poverty affects kids who live in it and what we could do together as a community to help improve t heir circumstances. I wanted kids here in Medfield to know there was something they could do to help kids who live in poverty and that by passing along their gently used clothing, books and toys, they could help kids in need. With the help of the school administration, I was able to have a Cradles to Crayons collection unit placed at the Wheelock School. I also ran several assemblies at the schools to educate kids about the affects of poverty on kids who live in it, and established several town-wide collections: an annual "Stuff the Truck" event for clothing, books and toys as well as a food drive for Medfield Food Cupboard. Olivia Taylor Previously, there had been no prominent tutoring service in Medfield for children in grades K-5. My project was to create a tutoring program that connected high school students with e lementary school students. It is a imed to improve core academic skills, as well as create a bridge between older and younger children. I ran a six-week program at the three elementary schools in Medfield for students in grades K-5, with 15 tutors and 36 participants across the three programs. The objective was to supplement what the kids were learning in class in a way that didn't fee l like school, a nd to help the kids with a new perspective. I also created a website to share my project, with an online sign-up to connect high school a nd elementary school students for one-on-one tuto r ing. In the end, I hope my project provided a new service for the children and their parents, and a leadership opportunity for the high school students.

This Saturday Medfield Girl Scouts is holding its annual Day of Community Service. Scouts will be collecting FOOD DONATIONS for the Medfield Food Cupboard at both Shaws and Brothers Supermarkets.  Scouts will also be collecting gently used YOUTH CLOTHING for Cradles to Crayons (C2C).  Clothing can be dropped off on Saturday from 10:00am to 12:00pm at the UCC, 496 Main Street.  Winter clothing items are most needed.  All food and clothing donations will be sorted and given directly to the Food Cupboard and C2C on Saturday!