Category Archives: Safety

Gas line exploded

This email just now from Kris –

There was a gas line explosion in the road at South and Philip. This line was currently undergoing work by the Gas Company. There are flames visible at the site. Both Medfield Police and Fire are at the scene. No injuries or property damage have been reported.

Traffic in that area is being detoured.

Kristine Trierweiler
Assistant Town Administrator

MCAP’s new website

MCAP Logo_1C_300

Medfield Cares About Prevention (MCAP) has a brand spanking new website.   Check it out at

  • looks great,
  • works great,
  • great content to help Medfield residents and youth find assistance.

Thanks to Medfield’s own Evan Weisenfeld for the website.

10th safest in Mass

10. Medfield (click here for full article)

As the birthplace of “Joy to the World” and “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” the community of Medfield values community spirit and get-togethers.  Also from Medfield is Hannah Adams, the first female author in America to be compensated for her work and  James Plimpton, inventor of the roller skate. This year, the whole town came together to safely dispose of more than 100 pounds of drugs on the annual Drug Take Back Day. Efforts like these keep dangerous medications out of town water supplies and the hands of the city’s youth.

Violent Crimes per 1,000: 0.97
Property Crimes per 1,000: 4.71
Safest cities in Massachusetts
Image: FlickreviewR; Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic


How We Chose the Safest Cities in Massachusetts

We looked at the most recent FBI Crime Report statistics from 2013 to determine Massachusetts’s 50 safest cities. We eliminated cities with a population below 8,000 residents and any city that did not submit a complete crime report to the FBI.
If your city made list, share the news by embedding the “Massachusetts Safest Cities” badge on your site. Click here to get the code, then just copy and paste. ——————————————————————————————————
Next, we assessed each remaining city based on the number of reported property crimes (arson, burglary, motor vehicle theft, and larceny-theft) and violent crimes (robbery, murder, aggravated assault, and rape). Finally, to level the playing field for all cities, we determined the chance of these crimes happening out of 1,000 people in each city.

Of the 50 cities that made our list, 49 reported no incidents of murder in 2013, and 40 percent reported fewer than 10 total violent crimes. In addition, 78 percent of the cities on our list had no reports of arson, and 33 cities reported fewer than five incidents of motor vehicle theft.

These 50 cities boast proactive public safety programs and shrewd security initiatives that help their residents feel safe and secure. If you call the Bay State home or if you’re considering a move, make sure to look over the cities whose safety records stood out enough to make our list.

No matter where you call home, it’s always prudent to know the most current and effective ways to keep your home and loved ones safe. Bookmark our Massachusetts Safety Directory to connect to up-to-date, comprehensive information about safety and security in the Bay State.

Concussions in Elementary School

This came from HVMA today, and was information I would like to have had when I was coaching girls soccer and basketball, so I am passing it along –

Concussions in Elementary School: What you need to know

boy with soccer ball.concussionImagine you’re seated at work when you receive a call from the school nurse who tells you your son hit his head during recess. Thankfully, he didn’t lose consciousness, so no concussion, right?

Not necessarily.

Elementary-aged students do not lose consciousness as easily as teens or adults do. They also may not yet have the language skills necessary to convey the pain or symptoms they are experiencing. They might simply say they don’t feel “good.” With children participating in contact sports at younger ages it is crucial for parents, coaches, teachers and school nurses to be aware of the signs of a concussion and diligent about any changes in behavior that could signal the need for treatment.

Changes in behavior in children with concussion may include:

  • Appearing dazed or stunned
  • Being unsure of game, score or opponent
  • Moving clumsily
  • Showing behavior or personality changes
  • Having difficulty organizing tasks or shifting between tasks
  • Displaying inappropriate or impulsive behavior
  • Exhibiting greater irritability
  • Behaving more emotional than usual
  • Experiencing fatigue
  • Having difficulty handling a stimulating school environment (lights, noise, etc.)
  • Experiencing other physical symptoms (headache, nausea, dizziness)

If you observe any of the above symptoms you should contact a healthcare professional immediately. They can help you set up a plan for treatment and recovery. It is important to work with your healthcare provider as concussions affect people differently. Younger children can experience symptoms lasting anywhere from a few days up to a week. While children often appear to bounce back from everyday injuries, they actually take longer to recover from concussions than adults.

The best treatment for concussions – regardless of age—is rest, both physically as well as mentally, as this helps the brain heal. Restricting strenuous physical activity and getting plenty of sleep are very important for a steady recovery, but rest also involves cognitive rest, which means limiting mental tasks that require concentration or focused thinking. This includes no or limited screen time (phone, TV, computer) as the screen can worsen symptoms. Lighter mental activities, such as listening to audio books or drawing, are usually acceptable. However, it is important to continue monitoring for increased pain or behavioral changes. School work and reading are to be reintroduced gradually, stopping if symptoms reappear. Regardless of a child’s seeming recovery, students need to be evaluated and cleared by a doctor before returning to school or sports.

Because children who play sports are at greater risk for concussion, Harvard Vanguard offers ImPACT testing, a computerized concussion evaluation tool. We perform baseline testing – done before a child has a concussion – for kids 10-19, which can then be used as a point of comparison for tracking recovery if a child experiences a head injury in the future.

– See more at:

Tornado watch

MEMA issued a tornado watch this afternoon, until 11 PM this evening, per email below from Mike Sullivan:

Received notice from MEMA of a tornado warning for most of Massachusetts, including Norfolk County until 11:00 p.m. this evening. Please note that this is a tornado watch and not a tornado warning, which means that it is a low risk event, with a low probability of tornado formation. However, people should be prepare for the possibility of a tornado forming, and be prepared to seek appropriate shelter if necessary. Mike Sullivan

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: MEMA State Control (CDA)
Date: Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 4:04 PM
Subject: Situational Awareness Statement #3: Tornado Watch Issued for All of Massachusetts

 DATE:          June 23, 2015

TIME:           4:00 PM

SUBJECT:      Situational Awareness Statement: Tornado Watch Issued


National Weather Service has issued a Tornado Watch for all of Massachusetts until 11:00 p.m. this evening.  A Tornado Watch means that conditions are favorable for the development of tornados.

Tell the FDA to Make Our Medicine Cabinets Safe!

Generic drugs make up 80% of all prescriptions filled in the United States. But in 2011 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that generic drug makers are not responsible for updating their safety labels to warn of newly discovered risks and as a result cannot be held accountable in court if their drugs injure or kill Americans.

Consumers are left in a dangerous Generic Drug Safety Loophole with safety labels that are not reliable and their access to justice denied.

There is good news: The FDA has a proposed a plan to fix the problem! But it is under attack from the generics industry.

We need your help to close the Generic Drug Safety Loophole!

Sign the new Take Justice Back petition.

We have launched a new petition to the FDA to remind them that safety is an issue that simply cannot wait. Already, more than 21,000 people have called on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to restore generic drug accountability – and we need you to add your name to the growing list!

Sign the new Take Justice Back petition.

Together we can prescribe accountability to the generic drug industry!

Thank you –

The Take Justice Back Team

PS: After you sign the petition, make sure to share it with your friends on Faceboook.


777 6th Street NW, Suite 200 | Washington, DC 20001 | 202-965-3500

Gas company on safety

This to the MFD Chief from the gas company –

Safety Concerns from Columbia Gas of Massachusetts

Serious Snow and Ice Safety Risks for Natural Gas Meters

Westborough, MA – Columbia Gas of Massachusetts is concerned with recent incidents involving large icicles and snow accumulation falling from rooftops onto natural gas meters. This can cause a rupture in the gas line and result in a serious gas leak. Also, snow and ice covered natural gas meters, and snow removing equipment striking gas meters has caused the release of natural gas.


With significant snowfall and frigid temperatures in the forecast, it is extremely important to make sure that your natural gas meter, and the exhaust vents for your heating equipment and other appliances are free of snow and ice. Gas equipment requires adequate airflow for safe combustion and proper venting of appliances to prevent a dangerous carbon monoxide situation.


The build-up of ice and snow around or over a natural gas meter poses a serious safety risk. Ice and snow falling from the eaves and gutters above your gas meter can damage the meter or service connections, potentially resulting in a gas leak. Please use a broom instead of a shovel to clear ice and snow from your gas meter. Don’t kick or hit the gas meter to break away snow and ice. Don’t shovel snow up against your meter. Be careful when using a snow blower or snow plow near your meter. Where possible, have a clear path to your gas meter in the event a technician or emergency responder should require access.


If your meter is encased in ice which you cannot remove, contact Columbia Gas for assistance at 1-800-677-5052. If you think there’s a problem with the gas piping or equipment, or if you smell gas, call Columbia’s 24-hour emergency line at 1-800-525-8222.


“The safety and comfort of our customers and communities is our number one priority,” said Steve Bryant, President of Columbia Gas of Massachusetts. “We ask that you be diligent in removing snow and ice from above and around your natural gas meter, keep your appliance vents clear and your gas meter accessible. With record snowfall over the past month and continuing in the next couple days, this winter season continues to be a challenge for us all.”


For more safety tips and information visit


Subject: Urgent Safety Message to CMA Customers
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 13:19:25 -0600

Dear Chief,

Due to the continuing forecast of frigid temperatures and snow accumulation, we have sent out the attached press release to our local media asking that they communicate this important message cautioning customers about large icicles and snow accumulation falling from rooftops onto natural gas meters.  We are also urging customer to remove ice and snow from their natural gas meters and gas appliance vents.

We have also cautioned customers to not use shovels to clear ice and snow from the natural gas meters.  We have also asked that they keep a clear, accessible path to the gas meter in the event a technician or emergency responder should require access.

Wherever possible we ask that you share this communication.  If you have the capabilities of posting this to your website, social media, or reverse 911 communications we would be most appreciative in assisting us in reaching as many customers as possible.

We have also sent an email blast to over 127,360 customers to whom we have email addresses.

We thank you for your support in our efforts to alert our customers to the safety risks associated with the accumulation of snow and ice around natural gas meters and gas appliance vents.

Andrea M. Luppi                                                                Don DiNunno
Manager Communications & Community Relations                                Manager Communications & Community Relations
Columbia Gas of Massachusetts                                                Columbia Gas of Massachusetts
2025 Roosevelt Avenue                                                                995 Belmont Avenue
Springfield, MA 01104                                                                Brockton, MA 02301
Office:  413-784-2145                                                                Office:  508-580-0100 ext. 1311
Cell:  413-530-0907                                                                Cell:  508-864-7099
Fax: 413-731-7788

Tracy Stefanowicz
External Affairs Specialist
External Communications
(413)784-2130 – Work
(413)276-5822 – Cell