Category Archives: Medfield State Hospital

MSH public input tonight

The Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee is seeking public input this evening at 7PM at the Blake Middle School cafeteria.

This was the crowd at the tour John Thompson lead last Sunday –

20170521-MSH Tour3 SC 052117_B6A6487

MSH workshop 5/24 at 7PM

From Gil Rodgers of the Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee –

Lee Chapel at msh

Master Planning Committee Holding Workshop on Hospital Reuse Alternatives

 

The Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee (MSHMPC) is pleased to announce a Public Meeting and Workshop at the Blake Middle School Gymnasium on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 from 7pm to 9:30pm. 


As part on the ongoing master planning process the MSHMP Committee has narrowed down the alternative scenarios and seeks public feedback at this critical juncture. Kathy McCabe and her team from McCabe Enterprises Consultants will present two scenarios that are the result of a collaborative process that includes input from three key sources:  (1) MSHMPC, (2) public input through meetings and surveys, and (3) the expertise of McCabe Enterprises.  The presentation will also incorporate analyses of external market forces that impact the property such as historic tax credits, regional housing needs, and business opportunities.

The focus will be on:

  • potential uses of the properties,
  • market priorities,
  • building and land assessments,
  • infrastructure considerations, and
  • financial analyses.

 

Feedback from the public is sought to help develop a preferred development scenario — which may be a combination or modification of the two alternatives presented — and also be used to identify priority features and elements for inclusion in the final development and implementation plans.

The format will be somewhat different than the February workshop held in the Medfield High School Cafeteria.  The agenda will begin with short presentations being made by MSHMPC and McCabe Enterprise consultants presenting overview and summary of the two scenarios and analyses of their impacts and implications.    Attendees will break into small “round-table” discussion groups facilitated by MSHMPC members.  As a new technique for gathering feedback, hand-held, electronic polling devices will be employed to obtain individual responses to a few key questions allowing for instant tabulation of responses.  Finally, using all of these steps and information a closing  presentation will summarize the conclusions.

MSHMPC encourages participation in this meeting and workshop as one of the most important decisions ever faced by Medfield that will have enduring implications for this community and neighboring communities.

MSHMPC Communications Subcommittee

Vote daily to 5/12

vote.2msh-lee-chapel-by-jt

VOTE DAILY ONLINE FOR CULTURAL ALLIANCE GRANT

The Cultural Alliance has submitted a video grant application. If the video gets enough votes (i.e. lands in the top 10 of the category “arts and culture”), it advances to the next round of evaluation which will award one application in each category $100k and two applications $50k each. A lot of money!
PLEASE VOTE FOR OUR VIDEO GRANT today and everyday thru May 12
http://act.usatoday.com/submit-an-idea/#/gallery/60445715

Leave a browser tab open, refresh the page each day, and click “VOTE.”

Votes needed for MSH

From Jean Mineo – her latest thing that helps us all.

vote.2

Hello Medfield Friends,
The Cultural Alliance has submitted a video grant application and we need your vote.

If the video gets enough votes (i.e. lands in the top 10 of the category “arts and culture”), it advances to the next round of evaluation which will award one application in each category $100k and two applications $50k each. A lot of money!

The link to the 2:45 minute video is here:

http://act.usatoday.com/submit-an-idea/#/gallery/60445715

Click on the green vote button next to the video to cast your vote! You may vote once a day, every day through May 12. There are no forms to fill out. Then please share on Facebook or Twitter using the buttons under the video and help spread the word.

The grant addresses the renovation of key historic buildings at the former Medfield State Hospital into an arts and cultural center. The money would go toward hiring an expert to secure historic tax credits worth about $2 million – applicable to any project renovating the Chapel within historic guidelines, even if it doesn’t become a cultural center. This is a valuable asset to our town that does not commit us to a specific use!

Thanks for your help! Like us on Facebook for progress reports:
https://www.facebook.com/CulturalAllianceofMedfield/

Jean

 

C 617-877-5158

JeanMineo@aol.com

@JeanRMineo

www.LinkedIn.com/in/JeanMineo

More on DIF & TIF

DIF houses-bus

http://www.mass.gov/envir/smart_growth_toolkit/pages/mod-diftif.htmlhttp://www.mass.gov/envir/smart_growth_toolkit/pages/mod-diftif.html

Both DIF and TIF provide municipalities with innovative tools to target districts or specific projects for redevelopment. The use of tax increments is the centerpiece of both tools. A tax increment is the difference between the beginning assessed value of the targeted property in its dilapidated state and the assessed value going forward in time, as the planned improvements take shape. The tax increment, calculated by the local Assessor, is the tax on the added value of new construction, rehabilitation or new equipment or machinery. Determining the value of the tax increment is essentially the same for both DIF and TIF. How the tax increment is used as an incentive, however, is very different. Using DIF, municipalities can pledge all or a portion of tax increments to fund district improvements over time. With TIF, municipalities may grant property tax exemptions to landowners of up to 100% of the tax increment for a fixed period.

District Improvement Financing (DIF)/
Tax Increment Financing (TIF)

In Brief: District Improvement Financing (DIF) and Tax Increment Financing (TIF) are economic tools that promote redevelopment by use of public/private partnerships. TIF offers tax breaks to developers, while DIF channels tax dollars into targeted redevelopment districts.

DIF & TIF for MSH

The cultural arts center analysis recommends the use of district improvement financing (DIF) and tax increment financing (TIF) as mechanisms for financing the cultural arts center and the needed infrastructure.  A DIF allows one to raise monies by issuing bonds that are paid back only out of property tax monies derived from the lands within the DIF boundaries, so the DIF could be the former Medfield State Hospital campus, and the rest of the town would not have to pay in. A TIF sounds like a straight tax break given to stimulate a particular result.

Interestingly, the DLS newsletter this month had the following article on those –

DLS

Ask DLS: Property Tax Incentive and Financing Program Changes

This month’s Ask DLS features questions relating to changes in economic and housing development property tax incentives and financing programs under the Job Creation and Workforce Development Act, Chapter 219 of the Acts of 2016, and the Municipal Modernization Act, Chapter 218 of the Acts of 2016. A summary of the changes made by the Municipal Modernization Act can be found in the August 18, 2016 issue of City & Town. We have also compiled the questions answered in the Municipal Modernization Act series of Ask DLS for your convenience. Please let us know if you have other areas of interest or send a question to cityandtown@dor.state.ma.us. We would like to hear from you.

What is the District Improvement Financing Program?

Under MGL c. 40Q, cities and towns may create one or more improvement districts within their boundaries to promote increased residential, industrial, and commercial activity. Development districts are created by action of the mayor and council in cities, and town meeting in towns.

The centerpiece of the district improvement financing (DIF) program is the “District Development Program,” which is a statement of means and objectives designed to improve the quality of life, the physical facilities and structures and the quality of pedestrian and vehicular traffic control and transportation within a development district. Development programs may also include means and objectives to increase residential housing, both market rate and affordable. Every development program must include a financial plan, which is a statement of the costs and revenue sources needed to carry out development programs, to include (1) cost estimates for the development program; (2) the amount of indebtedness to be incurred; and (3) sources of anticipated capital. MGL c. 40Q, sec. 2.

How is municipal financing of improvements under the DIF program different than financing of other improvements?

A unique financing option involves setting aside all or a portion of the additional taxes, generated by the public improvements entailed in the development program. Districts that set aside a portion of the rise in property tax revenues (the “increment”) to finance the development program are referred to as “invested revenue districts.” General obligation or revenue bonds can be issued in anticipation of higher property tax revenues spurred by the development program in the district.

The revenue from the retained tax increment is reserved and credited to two accounts. MGL c. 40Q, sec. 3. First in priority is the “development sinking fund account” that is used to cover payment of interest and principal on debt taken out to fund the program. Second priority goes to a “project cost account” to cover separate project costs as outlined in the financial plan for the program. An amendment made by the Municipal Modernization Act provides that the requirement to reserve the increment ends when sufficient monies have been reserved to cover the full, anticipated liabilities of both these accounts. MGL c. 40Q, sec. 3(d).

How is the District Improvement Financing tax increment calculated?

The Municipal Modernization Act amended the calculation of the tax increment reserved for debt service and project costs in cities and towns with invested revenue districts under MGL c. 40Q. It will now equal the actual new growth increase added to the municipality’s levy limit under Proposition 2½ for the development activity and expanded tax base within the district. MGL c. 40Q, sec. 1. The previous formula was based on certain adjusted valuation increases that were difficult to calculate, did not correspond to the new property tax revenue generated by the program and were not fixed until the tax rate for the year was set. The amount will now be known before the rate is set since it is based on Proposition 2½ new growth. Moreover, the assessors can provide a realistic estimate of the increment for budgeting purposes. This will ensure that the revenues generated by the increment are not used to support the budget generally.

The annual increment is based on the increase in the community’s levy limit (“new growth”) attributable to real estate parcels within the district for that year, including the portion attributable to prior years with an assessment date after the base date of the program. The percentage of the increment being reserved for financing the project must be specified as part of the district financing plan.

Example
District is created April 1, 2017
Base date is January 1, 2017 (FY18)
FY19 with January 1, 2018 assessment date is first year for tax increment

$100,000 of FY19 tax base growth is attributable to parcels in district
FY19 increment = $100,000.

$150,000 of FY20 tax base growth is attributable to parcels in district
FY20 increment = $252,500 [$102,500 ($100,000 FY19 increment increased by 2.5%) PLUS $150,000 additional increment]

$100,000 of FY21 tax base growth is attributable to parcels in district
FY21 increment = [$358,813 [$258,813 ($252,500 FY20 increment increased by 2.5%) PLUS $100,000 additional increment]

Where can municipalities enter into TIF Agreements?

The Job Creation and Workforce Development Act, Chapter 219 of the Acts of 2016, made a number of changes in the economic development incentive program (EDIP), which makes state tax credits and local property tax exemptions available for certain economic development projects. MGL c. 23A, secs. 3A3G. The EDIP program is administered by the state Economic Affairs Coordinating Council (EACC), which approves the tax incentives. The Act streamlined the requirements and procedures for the two local property tax exemptions under the program, which are the tax increment financing (TIF) exemption and the special tax assessment (STA).

Municipalities may now apply to the EACC to declare an area in their city or town, or contiguous areas in neighboring cities or towns, as eligible for TIF agreements. An area can be designated as TIF-eligible if the EACC finds that there is a strong likelihood that any of the following will occur within a specific and proximate period of time: (1) a significant influx or growth in business activity; (2) creation of a significant number of new jobs—not merely replacement or relocation of current jobs within the state; or (3) a private project or investment will contribute significantly to the resiliency of the local economy. It is no longer necessary that a TIF-eligible area be within an Economic Target Area (“ETA”).

Cities and towns can enter into TIF agreements with persons or entities undertaking either (1) certified projects, or (2) real estate or facility expansion projects in a TIF-eligible area. Any project must be consistent with the municipality’s economic development objectives and likely to increase or retain employment opportunities for residents of the municipality. MGL c. 23A, sec. 3E. A certified project is a project run by a business for which the EACC has approved state tax incentives. An eligible real estate project must be construction, rehabilitation or improvement of any building or other structure on a parcel of real property which, when completed, will result in at least a 100% increase in the assessed value of the real property over the assessed value of the real property prior to the project. A facility expansion project requires relocation from one location to another in the state or expansion of an existing facility that results in a net increase in the number of full-time jobs at the relocated or expanded facility. See definitions in MGL c. 23A, sec. 3A.

What happens to a local tax incentive for a certified project when the certification is revoked?

The 2016 Act clarified the impact of an EACC revocation of a certified project for a business that is also receiving a local tax incentive. MGL c. 23A, sec. 3F. The EACC can revoke state tax credits for certified projects that are in material non-compliance with the job creation or other requirements agreed to as a condition of the credits. The local tax incentive will now terminate at the beginning of the tax year in which the material non-compliance occurred, unless the agreement between the municipality and business expressly provides otherwise. If a local tax incentive is terminated, the municipality may amend the agreement to continue it. The amended agreement must be approved by the legislative body and EACC. In addition, the municipality may recapture the previously foregone taxes by making a “special assessment” on the taxpayer in the year after the year of the EACC’s decision to revoke project certification. The recapture could go as far back as the finding of material non-compliance. The procedure for municipalities to assess and collect the recaptured amount as a property tax is also spelled out.

What is the new local option to promote creation of middle income housing? (Republished from March 2, 2017 City & Town)

Under G.L. c. 40, sec. 60B, cities and towns may, through their respective legislative bodies, provide for Workforce Housing Special Tax Assessments (WH-STA’s) as incentive to create middle-income housing. Municipal Modernization Act, Chapter 218, sec. 39 of the Acts of 2016. Unlike other property tax incentives, such as economic development tax increment finance (TIFs) agreements, no state-level approval is required. Local WH-STA plans may allow for exemptions as great as 100% of the fair cash value of the property during the first two years of construction. Over a three-year stabilization phase following construction, the exemptions are available in declining maximum percentages of the fair cash value.

To use this incentive, a city or town must designate one or more areas that present exceptional opportunities for increased development of middle income housing as WH-STA zones. The plan must describe in detail all construction activities and types of residential developments intended for the WH-STA zone. The city or town must also promulgate regulations establishing eligibility requirements for developers to enter into WH-STA agreements. The regulations must address procedures for developers to apply for a WH-STA; the minimum number of new residential units to be constructed to qualify for WH-STA tax incentives; maximum rental prices and other eligibility criteria to facilitate and encourage construction of workforce housing.

The city or town may then enter into tax agreements with property owners in WH-STA zones that will set maximum rental prices that may be charged by the owner to create middle income workforce housing.

The revised Cultural Arts Facility Feasibility Study

DBVW Architrects-cultural arts center

I had not realized that Louise Stevens had done an updated revision to her financial analysis of a cultural arts center at the former Medfield State Hospital site, so I am posting a link to that updated report here –

20170406-ArtsMarket-Medfield Feasibility Report April REV

DBVW Architrects-cultural arts center-glass connector

These renderings are from the DBVW Architects report –

20170406-DBVW Architrects-1624_Existing-Conditions-Report_17-0403-Email(1)