Category Archives: Financial

BoS on 11/21/17

Here is an updated agenda and the back up materials.  These back up materials contain the Schedule A financial summary the Town of Medfield files annually with the Massachusetts Department of Revenue, that gives a complete summary of the town finances.

20171121-Meeting Materials

MEETING I PPSTED TOWN CLERK·. TOWN OF MEDFIELD t{LCl::.ivtu · l'UWN OF MEDFIELD. MASS NOTICE POSTED IN AccoRDANcE wITH THE PRovisioNs oF M.G.L. cHAPrE28n9r~H,U~3~ WMENDED. Board of Selectmen OFFICE OF THf TOWN 8LERK Board or Committee PLACE OF MEETING DAY, DATE, AND TIME Town House, Chenery Meeting Room, 2"d Floor Tuesday, November 21, 2017 7:00PM Agenda (Subject to Change) 7:00 Call to Order Disclosure of Video Recording Announcement We want to take a moment of appreciation for our Troops serving in the Middle East and around the world. Appointments 7: 15 Medfield State Hospital Building and Grounds Committee Citizen Comment Action Items Selectmen are invited to the Eagle Scout Court of Honor on Saturday, December 2, 2017. Vote to sign the Eagle Scout Certificate of Achievement for: Garrett Theodore Gipson Roberta A. Raine Tyler James Hatch Stephen Daniel Williams Discussion of Board of Selectmen 2018 A TM Warrant Articles Pending Items Town Administrator Evaluation Discussion Town Wide Goals Veterans Service Officer Annual Appointments Lot 3 Discussion MSHMPC issuance ofRFP for Facilitation Services Licenses and Permits (Consent Agenda) Katie Walsh, owner of Capsule, requests a one day Liquor permit for the Holiday Stroll on December 1, 2017 from 5PM to 9PM. (70 North Street) MEMO requests a Parade Permit for the Annual Holiday Parade on Saturday, December 2, 2017 at 1 :OOPM. MEMO also invites the BOS to lead the parade and participate in the Tree Lighting Festivities on December 1, 2017 at Baxter Park. Town Administrator Update Update on 11/17 meeting with the DOT and Legislators regarding West Street/Route 109 Bridge Informational 2017 Schedule A Town House closed at lPM on Nov 22. Closed on 11/23 and 11124 for Thanksgiving Holiday. Cushman House Lottery Application for 67 North Street20171121-agenda-final_Page_2

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Public Safety Building was a bargain

The table below about Public Safety Building costs was shared this week, first by a Gilbane Construction employee with Mike Quinlan, chair of the Building Committee, then to Mike Sullivan, and then to the Board of Selectmen.

To me it is reassuring to see both that the cost of our Public Safety Building was relatively low, but also that our size comports with what other towns are deciding to build, which reaffirms the appropriateness of the recommendations of the Building Committee about the size of a building that was needed.  Congratulations and thanks are again in order to the Building Committee for successfully steering the town through that project!

I have had many meetings in both conference rooms that are available for public use in the Public Safety Building, and can attest to both their quality and utility.

Publis safety bld prices

 

This was the accompanying email from Mike Sullivan that makes our low cost per sq. ft. even more remarkable –

FYI. This came in this morning from Mike Quinlan. Confirms what we’ve been hearing about what a good price (relatively) we got on out public safety building. Especially since our project included construction of the Dale St. School parking lot, repair of the Adams Street basketball/tennis court, and installation of solar panels. Even better, we still have over $500K left in out accounts. Mike S

Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan

Jerry McCarty, Facilities Director, presented his tome, Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan, to the Board of Selectmen on Tuesday.

Jerry’s work evaluates the current conditions of the town buildings, lists deferred maintenance, and lays out routine expected maintenance over the next 20 years. This is the first time that the town has had this data compiled, and the bad news is that we have allowed about $43 m. in deferred maintenance to accumulate and we face an estimated $68 m. more of routine maintenance over the next 20 years.

We owe Jerry a huge thanks for taking on and completing this task, much of it done on his own time, so as to not interfere with his regular work. Jerry will include the pavement management plan when that is completed, and add sections for the Public Safety Building, the DPW Garage, and the Dwight-Derby House when his has the time. Then if we add the vehicle replacement schedule we should have most town capital expenses covered and we can plan how to implement the work and pay for it. It would have been better to plan this way long ago.

This is a link to the whole 558 page report  Medfield Facilities Report 10-2017.pdf

And these pages are the Executive Summary (NB – I left out the text of all 558 pages in the “Alt. Text” window which allows all the text to be word searched, as I think that amount of data may have been what was crashing the prior two attempts to post this, as that had to be a lot of data) –

 

Pages from 20171013-Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan_Page_1

Pages from 20171013-Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan_Page_2Pages from 20171013-Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan_Page_3Pages from 20171013-Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan_Page_4Pages from 20171013-Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan_Page_5Pages from 20171013-Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan_Page_6Pages from 20171013-Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan_Page_7Pages from 20171013-Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan_Page_8Pages from 20171013-Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan_Page_9

 

Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan

Municipal Facilities Evaluation and Capital Plan

Meals tax revenue

meals tax

Medfield netted $135,123 for FY 16 (the last year for which we have the complete yearly figures) from our meals tax, which our annual town meeting (ATM) enacted a few years ago.  I think of the meals tax as the town’s chance to tax the residents of our surrounding towns for enjoying our excellent restaurants.   At the Tuesday meeting of the Board of Selectmen Mike Sullivan shared his historic record of our net since the ATM adopted the meals tax.  I especially like the trajectory and the rate of growth.  I also especially like seeing documentation that our restaurants are doing increasingly much more business year over year.

LOCAL MEALS TAX RECEIPTS FY15 - FY17 FISCAL YEAR SEPTEMBER DECEMBER MARCH JUNE TOTAL 15 16 17 $7,916 $33,405 $37,559 $30,743 $31,924 $36,886 $30,672 $29,462 $98,793 $36,886 $32,908 $135,123 $37,589

More on chip seal

I asked Maurice Goulet, the Director of the DPW, a follow up question about chip seal and got more really useful information back from him this morning (a copy of that email appears below – I also inserted Moe’s original information at the end).  The “capital” he references is the town’s annual capital budget, which typically allocates monies to resurface subdivision roads.

chip seal

On Sat, Jul 8, 2017 at 11:26 AM, Osler L. Peterson <osler.peterson@verizon.net> wrote:

Moe,

I am sorry to be late in responding to your materials, but yes, that is hugely helpful, and exactly the quantification of the cost differential that assists me to understand the magnitude of savings.  I just had time to post your data on my blog, and I am betting that the residents will be equally as appreciative as I am at your putting that material together for us.

So a big thank you from me for doing that and for doing it so well and so clearly.

I guess I do have one follow up chip seal question as I think about it today, namely how many miles of chip seal do we typically do per year?  Even if the savings percentage is really high, if the actual total spending amount is not too great per year, we might still opt to asphalt – e.g. I bet the town residents might opt for pavement over chip seal if it only cost us $100K more per year.  Thanks in advance.

Best,

Pete

Osler L. Peterson, Esq.

===========================================================

Pete,

It would be difficult to give you an estimate in roadway miles as our roadways differ so much in width, however speaking with Bobby Kennedy we average about $150,000 – $200,000 per year on chip seal.

With the calculations I had sent you, it would cost approximately $425,000 – $575,000 for overlay (does not include costs of adjusting castings and repairing driveway aprons) and $555,000 – $750,000 for mill and overlay if we were to resurface the same amount of roadways. This would drastically reduce the number of roadways we could maintain per year. Once our pavement management system is in place, we will have a better understanding of the town’s needs. Even with the pavement management system, it may not consider to utilize chip seal as much, reducing the number of roadways that are resurfaced. (Chapter 90 state funding allotment for Medfield is $395,076 per year plus usually $30,000 – $40,000 from capital) The roadways that are not resurfaced puts added pressure on the Highway Division for maintenance throughout the year.

Thanks,

===========================================================

From: Maurice Goulet [mailto:mgoulet@medfield.net]
Sent: Friday, July 7, 2017 8:30 AM
To: Osler L. Peterson <osler.peterson@verizon.net>
Cc: Mike Sullivan <msullivan@medfield.net>
Subject: Chip Seal and Overlay Comparison

Pete,

Below is a comparison of Chip Sealing roadways vs. Pavement Overlay and/or Mill and Overlay as requested.

Consider a scenario of 1 mile of roadway that is 20 feet wide at current contractor prices:

5,280 feet long X 20 feet wide / 9 = 11,733 square yards

$24,639 – chip seal

$69,922 – pavement overlay

(65% savings)

(pavement overlay does not include raising structures such as catch basins, manholes and gates, and reconstructing driveway aprons affected by raising pavement elevation, pavement elevation changes also creates new drainage issues)

Overlaying on a distressed roadway develops reflective cracking through the new surface within a few years affecting longevity of the surface. Milling (grinding) and overlay would then be considered as the preferred method.

$24,639 – chip seal

$91,628 – mill and overlay

(73% savings)

 

Please let me know if you have any questions. Hope this is helpful.

Maurice G. Goulet

Director of Public Works

Medfield, Massachusetts