Category Archives: DPW

Bridge repairs – West St. & Rte. 109

Bridge repairs – West St. & Rte. 109

At the Board of Selectmen meeting last Tuesday, Mike Sullivan reported on his recent meeting with the Massachusetts DOT about getting the bridges to Millis on Rte. 109 and West Street repaired, and the funding to do so.  Mike reported that the suggestion was to split the West Street bridge repairs three ways between Medfield, Millis and the state, with our share expected to come in at $50-100K.  Mike said the state acknowledged that the Rte. 109 bridge repairs were a state financial responsibility.

bridge meeting

 

This photo is from Shawn Dooley’s Facebook post on the topic.

 

Below is the email from Mike to selectmen about the bridge repairs from before our meeting.

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Moe and I, along with the Millis Town Administrator and DPW Director and Representative Dooley, met with the District 3 Engineer and a couple of his staff this morning at their Worcester office to discuss the West Street bridge repairs and the condition of the Route 109 bridge. We thought it went very well. The agreed to participate in the cost of temporary bridge repairs to the West Street bridge and said they would look around to see how much money they could come up with. They will get back to us on that. That would mean the cost of temporary repairs would be spread among Millis, Medfield and Mass DOT. The spread is yet to be determined. Depending upon which option is selected. they felt the repairs might add 10to 15 years to the life of the bridge, which by the way is 48 years old (1969). In the meantime, they would try to get the bridge listed on the bridge program, which is federally funded, and that could eventually pay for the construction of a new bridge. Moe is going to meet with some other District 3 staff on Monday to review the status of Route 109 funding, but I doubt if they’l have an answer on how much they will contribute by then. They said that the 109 bridge is clearly state owned and that they thought it was in reasonablly good condition, graded a five out of ten, but they will check it out to make sure. Any work on that bridge will be paid for by the state.

 

Also, our DPW, along with a crew from Mass Coastal Railroad, are replacing the railroad ties and the asphalt on the sidewalk at the Dale Street crossing today. he is also exploring with the the possibility of doing something similar on the Farm Street crossing, but that’s more complicated so don’t expect a crew out next week.

Mike S.

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Disappearing crosswalk

RR

Main St. crosswalk at RR tracks will return

Observant resident of the month, Marge Vasaturo, asked me at the Veterans Day Luminary event on Saturday whether the crosswalk on Main Street by the railroad crossing would return.  I had to ask Mike Sullivan if there had in fact been one there, and Mike recalled that there was one there, and in turn asked Maurice Goulet, Director of DPW if it was coming back – and yes it will be returning.

By an interesting quirk of town budgeting history, the Medfield Police Department actually paints the lines on the streets the DPW repair, and Moe reported to Mike that there were a few items that the Police Chief is arranging to get painted that were left out when Rte. 109 was repaved last summer.

And as your award Marge, here is a photo of the Vasaturo family luminaries –

vasaturo luminary

Philips Street bridge timing

philip st bridge

Maurice Goulet, DPW Director, sent a resident an email update today on the timing of the Philips Street bridge repair (a copy of the email appears below) –

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The RFP has been sent out to prospective bidders. Within 2-3 weeks we should have a fabricator selected and begin the manufacturing of the deck. The final repairs of the bridge will be determined by the winter weather and the awarding contractor availability at the time coordination is setup with the delivery of the pre-fabricated bridge.

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We were previously told that the fabrication will take about 16 weeks.

Based on information and belief, there is some concern that once the bridge work is completed, that bridge abutter Alec Stevens may not cede back to the town his basketball court (f/k/a Philips Street).

Rte. 109 repaving starts tonight

Repaving Starts Tonight

Per Mike Sullivan at the Board of Selectmen meeting last night, the repaving of Rte. 109 starts this evening, with all work running from 7PM to 6AM:

  • Wednesday – grinding from RR tracks to Brook Street
  • Thursday – grinding from RR tracks to Causeway Street
  • Sunday and Monday – paving

Route 109 repaving

Route 109 Repaving

Chief Meaney provided the explanation below to Colleen Sullivan in response to her query today about the details of the Rte. 109 road work that starts next week.  Look for Colleen’s more complete story on Patch.

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Colleen,

 

Maurice Goulet of the DPW is away this week but I will give you my understanding of the project. I attended a pre construction meeting on July 24 and these are the highlights:

 

The work is currently scheduled to begin next week as the signs indicate.

 

The area of Route 109 affected will be the center of Medfield as well as a short distance east of the intersection with South Street and west of the intersection with Route 27.

 

The work will involve grinding the surface of Route 109 down two inches. There may be some leveling of the roadway done at this point.

 

Any structures in the roadway that need to be leveled or repaired will also be done at this point.

 

The roadway will then be repaved to the same level.

 

The part of the project most disruptive to traffic (grinding and paving) will be done at night.

 

As part of the grinding process, the loop detectors, which assist in controlling the traffic lights during non-peak traffic times, will be replaced. This will mean that for a few days the traffic lights will be on an automatic cycle. You will likely only notice this late at night. Normally, when you approach the lights at night or during light traffic periods, the loop detector would realize there is a vehicle there and the lights will change to provide a green light to the motorist. While the lights are on the automatic cycle, this does not happen, so people will wait a short time longer during the overnights.

 

There will be some work done during the day but this will be less of a disruption to traffic.

 

Once started, the project should be done in a couple of weeks.

 

Mike Sullivan is also willing to discuss the project with you and Maurice Goulet will be back on Monday.

 

Hope this helps…..Bob

More on chip seal

I asked Maurice Goulet, the Director of the DPW, a follow up question about chip seal and got more really useful information back from him this morning (a copy of that email appears below – I also inserted Moe’s original information at the end).  The “capital” he references is the town’s annual capital budget, which typically allocates monies to resurface subdivision roads.

chip seal

On Sat, Jul 8, 2017 at 11:26 AM, Osler L. Peterson <osler.peterson@verizon.net> wrote:

Moe,

I am sorry to be late in responding to your materials, but yes, that is hugely helpful, and exactly the quantification of the cost differential that assists me to understand the magnitude of savings.  I just had time to post your data on my blog, and I am betting that the residents will be equally as appreciative as I am at your putting that material together for us.

So a big thank you from me for doing that and for doing it so well and so clearly.

I guess I do have one follow up chip seal question as I think about it today, namely how many miles of chip seal do we typically do per year?  Even if the savings percentage is really high, if the actual total spending amount is not too great per year, we might still opt to asphalt – e.g. I bet the town residents might opt for pavement over chip seal if it only cost us $100K more per year.  Thanks in advance.

Best,

Pete

Osler L. Peterson, Esq.

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Pete,

It would be difficult to give you an estimate in roadway miles as our roadways differ so much in width, however speaking with Bobby Kennedy we average about $150,000 – $200,000 per year on chip seal.

With the calculations I had sent you, it would cost approximately $425,000 – $575,000 for overlay (does not include costs of adjusting castings and repairing driveway aprons) and $555,000 – $750,000 for mill and overlay if we were to resurface the same amount of roadways. This would drastically reduce the number of roadways we could maintain per year. Once our pavement management system is in place, we will have a better understanding of the town’s needs. Even with the pavement management system, it may not consider to utilize chip seal as much, reducing the number of roadways that are resurfaced. (Chapter 90 state funding allotment for Medfield is $395,076 per year plus usually $30,000 – $40,000 from capital) The roadways that are not resurfaced puts added pressure on the Highway Division for maintenance throughout the year.

Thanks,

===========================================================

From: Maurice Goulet [mailto:mgoulet@medfield.net]
Sent: Friday, July 7, 2017 8:30 AM
To: Osler L. Peterson <osler.peterson@verizon.net>
Cc: Mike Sullivan <msullivan@medfield.net>
Subject: Chip Seal and Overlay Comparison

Pete,

Below is a comparison of Chip Sealing roadways vs. Pavement Overlay and/or Mill and Overlay as requested.

Consider a scenario of 1 mile of roadway that is 20 feet wide at current contractor prices:

5,280 feet long X 20 feet wide / 9 = 11,733 square yards

$24,639 – chip seal

$69,922 – pavement overlay

(65% savings)

(pavement overlay does not include raising structures such as catch basins, manholes and gates, and reconstructing driveway aprons affected by raising pavement elevation, pavement elevation changes also creates new drainage issues)

Overlaying on a distressed roadway develops reflective cracking through the new surface within a few years affecting longevity of the surface. Milling (grinding) and overlay would then be considered as the preferred method.

$24,639 – chip seal

$91,628 – mill and overlay

(73% savings)

 

Please let me know if you have any questions. Hope this is helpful.

Maurice G. Goulet

Director of Public Works

Medfield, Massachusetts

 

Chip seal

chip seal

None of prefer the chip seal treatment of our side streets, but given the cost differential, I have come to accept it as a cost effective solution.  Please understand that residents are free to opt at the annual town meeting (ATM) to vote to pave streets with asphalt instead of using chip seal.  All spending decision ultimately belong to us, the residents, at our ATM. –

Since I recently had a resident question me about the use of chip seal on his street and since I have historically heard the same questions, I asked our DPW Director, Maurice Goulet,  if he could quantify the cost savings to share with residents.

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Pete,

Below is a comparison of Chip Sealing roadways vs. Pavement Overlay and/or Mill and Overlay as requested.

Consider a scenario of 1 mile of roadway that is 20 feet wide at current contractor prices:

5,280 feet long X 20 feet wide / 9 = 11,733 square yards

 

$24,639 – chip seal

$69,922 – pavement overlay

(65% savings)

(pavement overlay does not include raising structures such as catch basins, manholes and gates, and reconstructing driveway aprons affected by raising pavement elevation, pavement elevation changes also creates new drainage issues)

 

Overlaying on a distressed roadway develops reflective cracking through the new surface within a few years affecting longevity of the surface. Milling (grinding) and overlay would then be considered as the preferred method.

 

$24,639 – chip seal

$91,628 – mill and overlay

(73% savings)

 

Please let me know if you have any questions. Hope this is helpful.

Maurice G. Goulet

Director of Public Works

Medfield, Massachusetts

 

Department of Public Works

55 North Meadows Road

Medfield, MA 02052

(508) 359-8597 office

(508) 359-4050 fax

mgoulet@medfield.net

www.town.medfield.net