Category Archives: Council on Aging

Lot 3 & Hinkley

LOT 3

Lot 3 & Hinkley Property

The Board of Selectmen received the following memo from the Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee at last night’s (really long – 4+ hours) meeting.  I am an abutter to an abutter of both Hinkley and Lot 3 (in blue above), so I recuse myself from any discussions about either.

After hearing from Chair Nolan and his fellow committee members, the Selectmen agreed last night to allow the Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee process, as planned, to proceed to its expected January special town meeting (STM) to consider the rezoning and disposition of the Medfield State Hospital land, instead of doing either an immediate disposition and/or a commercial use disposition.

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MEMORANDUM

 

TO:                 Medfield Board of Selectmen                      

FROM:           Stephen M. Nolan, Chair

Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee

           

RE:                 Hinkley Property and Lot 3, Ice House Road       

DATE:           July 6, 2017   

 

At your meeting on June 20, 2017, Mike Marcucci raised the possibility that Lot 3 on Ice House Road (“Lot 3”) and the adjacent Hinkley property (the “Hinkley Property”) be removed from the purview of the Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee (the “Committee”) and instead assigned to the newly-created Affordable Housing Trust (the “Trust”).  I raised this subject for discussion at our Committee meeting the following evening.  After further discussion at our meeting on July 5, the Committee voted unanimously to recommend to Board of Selectmen that Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property remain as part of our charge, with the understanding that two members of our Committee would be designated to work with one or more members of the Trust and/or the Affordable Housing Committee on an RFP for disposition of Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property to one or more developers for the following uses: 42 units of senior affordable rental housing (40B compliant) on Lot 3 and approximately 15 small single-family units on the Hinkley Property.  Our thought process is set forth in more detail below.

 

  1. Intended Use of Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property.

The consensus that has emerged from our public sessions, our meetings with the Council on Aging and the Senior Housing Study Committee and Committee deliberations is that the most desirable use for Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property is senior housing.  The principal reasons for this are twofold: access to The Center and the possibility that a senior housing development could happen on a more expedited basis than the re-development of the MSH core campus because infrastructure is more readily available and the properties are distinct enough from the core campus to be susceptible of proceeding on an independent track without pre-determining other uses at the core campus that are still under discussion.  The Council on Aging has expressed potential willingness to cede a small portion  of the land at the corner of The Center adjacent to Hinkley for purposes of enhancing the development potential of the Hinkley Property.  In addition, our consultant has advised that more intense commercial uses at Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property are likely to negatively impact The Center and overload Ice House Road.

Concern has been expressed by some, including Mike Sullivan and Gus Murby, about using a commercially zoned property for residential purposes, but the overall MSH master plan is likely to include not only a site on the MSH property for a recreational facility (whether Town-owned, private or public-private-partnership is a subject to be addressed by the Town) but also other commercially-designated parcels at the core campus that are more likely to draw interest from commercial users due to their favorable location in midst of a vital redevelopment project.  Given the proximity of the MSH property to McCarthy Park and the fact that there are no restrictive covenants applicable to that land (unlike the covenants that the Town is subject to under the Kingsbury Club lease), the MSH property is a more favorable site for a recreational facility.  And we have heard from the Economic Development Committee that the only serious proposal for a commercial use at Lot 3 that came out of their request for expressions of interest was a recreational facility, the other potential use being senior housing.  If other land at the MSH property is being proposed for such a use as well as other commercial uses, the Committee does not see any disadvantage to changing the zoning of Lot 3 to residential, effectively swapping this commercial land for other more-suitable commercial land at the MSH property.

  1. Advantages to Keeping Properties within MSH Master Plan.

The biggest reason for keeping Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property as part of the charge of the Committee is that by doing so they can be rezoned as part of the overall re-zoning of the MSH property.  Such re-zoning will significantly enhance the value of the properties because a developer will not be required to obtain a Chapter 40B comprehensive permit, which is both time-consuming and expensive, even if it is a “friendly 40B”.  In addition, the Committee believes that moderately-priced single-family homes are in demand by Medfield seniors and such units would not qualify for a comprehensive permit.  So without including the Hinkley Property under the MSH re-zoning, those units would not be feasible at the Hinkley Property.  The Committee is also looking at possible creation of a Chapter 40R district that would encompass Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property, possibly resulting in financial incentive payments to the Town.

An additional consideration is that the MSH master plan is more likely to succeed at Town Meeting if it draws upon the broadest coalition of supporters, including seniors and advocates for maintaining safe harbor status under Chapter 40B.  The Committee believes that if key parts of the redevelopment plan are removed from our scope and made stand-alone proposals, the MSH master plan is less likely to pass due to the loss of constituencies who might otherwise be expected to vigorously support the master plan.  This dissipation of support through segmentation of the plan poses a real risk to our ability to muster two-thirds support at Town Meeting.

Finally, in examining the financial impact of the MSH redevelopment, the location of senior housing at Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property, rather than at the core campus, will produce a net shift of positive economic benefits from the core campus to Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property due to (i) senior housing being a net revenue generator because of the lack of school children and (ii) a relatively higher purchase price for those properties because of lower infrastructure costs.  On the other hand, the possibility of family housing around the core campus and the higher infrastructure costs are likely to make the financials at the core campus more challenging.  For these reasons we prefer to keep Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property within our scope.

  1. Potential Disposition Process and Timing.

Finally, the issue of speed needs to be examined in light of other affordable housing efforts in Town.  We look to the Selectmen, the Affordable Housing Committee and the Affordable Housing Trust for guidance in this area.  We are aware of multiple efforts on the affordable housing front, including Tilden Village (42+ units), the American Legion property (42+ units), Lot 3 (42 units) and the core campus (undetermined number of units, but likely at least 50 units).  The combination of these units would bring the Town over the 10% mark.  Managing the delivery of these units so as to keep within safe harbor will be a complicated task, but given the difficulty of getting projects permitted and funded, it seems to us better to be pro-active and have multiple irons in the fire rather than trying to stretch out efforts in order to avoid overlap.  If one of the proposed projects were to slip for unanticipated reasons and another wasn’t well along in the process, the Town could fall out of safe harbor, and be vulnerable to unfriendly 40Bs.  In addition, the seniors in Town are impatient for progress on the goal of providing alternative housing options in order to avoid losing more of their number to out-of-town options.

Because Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property are Town-owned properties, they require a public disposition process in addition to re-zoning.  We would propose that the Town proceed on a parallel track to prepare a disposition RFP that would allow for selection of a preferred developer/purchaser, subject to re-zoning and Town Meeting approval.  This would allow for a potential disposition shortly after Town Meeting in January.  We have already done significant planning work with respect to Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property, including wetlands mapping and infrastructure analysis, and as a result our Committee is familiar with the constraints and development potential of the two sites.  Because our planning consultant is working with us on possible lay-outs of Lot 3 and the Hinkley Property and because, as stated above, we believe it makes sense to keep the properties under the MSH master plan, we suggest our Committee proceed to work on an RFP for the disposition, either as a single project comprising both the affordable senior rentals (40B) and the moderately-priced single family units or as two separate projects. We would consult with the Affordable Housing Trust and Affordable Housing Committee as we draft the RFP and we would welcome their input.  A recommendation on disposition as one single or two separate projects would be made by the Committee, once it digs into the substance more thoroughly and examines the merits of both approaches.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Affordable housing

The Board of Selectmen did two things last night related to affordable housing.

affordable-housing

First the selectmen heard a report from the Senior Housing Study Committee about its seeking to have the town donate the nine acre Hinkley land next to The Center for the purpose of building 5-6 moderately priced ranch houses per acre there. About half of the Hinkley land is wetlands, so that could amount to about 25 homes.  The committee said it would put its slides online.

Second, the selectmen hired the Community Opportunities Group as our consultant to assist the town with planning and executing the town’s affordable housing strategy.  We hired the Community Opportunities Group for its $38,000 bid amount.  Community Opportunities Group submitted the only response to the town’s RFP, with a not to exceed $40,000 limit.  Community Opportunities Group assisted the town in preparation of the Housing Production Plan that we approved last fall, and Assistant Town Administrator, Kristine Trierweiler, stated that she was more than satisfied with its past work for the town.  Click this link to see its proposal –  20170117-community-opportunities-group-inc-proposal

Praise for COA

Email received from renown Medfield basketball player Jerry Cianciolo –

Center_and_sign

An Open Letter to the Medfield Selectmen

 

It may be the best kept secret in Medfield.  Certainly to many under the age of 65 it’s something unknown.

 

But more than nine-hundred older people and their families who use the facility daily, weekly, or monthly will tell you what a gem the town has in The Center at Medfield.

 

As one who offers a workshop for those with a touch of gray, I’m familiar with senior centers throughout the area.  To their credit many are good, but only a handful are great. Ours falls into the latter category.

 

Walk into One Ice House Road, home to the Medfield Council on Aging, and what you feel at once is warmth.  There’s not a bureaucrat in sight.  Not only are you immediately at ease but intuitively you sense your needs will be addressed and your questions answered.  What permeates is an atmosphere of competence and conviviality.

 

What I find equally striking about The Center is the bustle inside.  I’ve visited senior centers in the early afternoon and found many to be strangely empty and quiet.  In Medfield it’s the opposite.  On any given day, The Center teems with exercise groups, enrichment classes, fashion shows, 12-piece swing bands, retirement seminars, ballroom dancing, card games, respite care activities, and a friendly gent or two eyeing the topography of a 1000-piece jigsaw puzzle.

 

Many deserve credit for the success of The Center, among them Susan Bernstein, Cheryl Lavallee, Bill Pardi, Kathy Powers, and the unfailingly friendly receptionists at the front desk.

 

But it is director Roberta Lynch who is The Center’s fulcrum, the magnet that pulls everyone and everything together.  I’ve known Roberta for only a short time, but up-close I’ve observed her unerring instincts for hiring the right people, setting the perfect tone, and experimenting with different, even novel approaches.  All the while she makes the complexity of her job seem deceptively easy.

 

Oh yes, and Roberta listens.  Walk in The Center and you’ll find her door always open – whether you simply want to share a funny story or need a compassionate ear to help you navigate a crisis.

 

Many older people have a bias against senior centers.  I did.  But take a step or two into The Center at Medfield and you’ll have that notion completely dispelled.

 

Jerry Cianciolo

Minds in Motion Workshop

Medfield

 

 

BoS on 9/22

cropped-medfield-town-house2.jpg

Tuesday September 22, 2015 @ 7:00 PM
AGENDA (SUBJECT TO CHANGE)

7:00 PM   Council on Aging, Roberta Lynch Director Discussion regarding FY17 budget

7:30 PM   Warrant Committee
Preliminary discussion for FY17 budgets

Storm shut downs

Mike Sullivan just called to update me on town plans in light of the storm and their conference call this morning with MEMA, and reports the following:

  • MEMA counseled that the strong winds are likely to be the major problem, as wind gusts are predicted to get reach 70 MPH, and with light fluffy snow there will be lots of drifting
  • NSTAR counsels that power outages should be reported to them, not the town, as calls to NSTAR are logged by its computer systems and algorithms to make its lists of what to fix first
  • Council on Aging, Medfield Park & Recreation Commission, and the Medfield Memorial Library have already announced that they will be closed both Tuesday and Wednesday
  • the schools will be letting people know their decision soon
  • we agreed to cancel the Board of Selectmen meeting for tomorrow evening

Please hunker down for the storm and keep safe.

On being a selectman

Board of Selectmen Meeting

When the selectmen meeting ended at 9PM on Tuesday evening, I walked over to the Bros. Marketplace, and despite learning that they had just closed (they were all cleaning up), they still let me buy a loaf of bread to make a meal out of.  The friendliness of that gesture, along with the tasty bread, won me over to being a customer.  Just as I find in my law practice, it is all about the customer service.

Medfield State Hospital

Meeting last night of the Negotiating Committee with DCAMM.  Again dinner after 9PM.

Arts Center

Jean Mineo came to my office hours in Straw Hat Park this morning, and laid out her plans to seek some sort of community arts center as part of the Medfield State Hospital site redevelopment.  She noted that the arts center in Maynard is cited by residents in that town as the thing in town of which they are most proud, and that the DeCordova in Lincoln in a signature feature of that town.  This concept got me really excited for the possibilities.

Jean said that she is also looking to identify all artists in town, so that they can start to communicate with one another, and perhaps collaborate in mutually beneficial ways.  If you are a Medfield artist, you should get in touch with Jean.

 

Housing for those Age 55+

Roberta Lynch, Director of the Council on Aging, came to my office hours at The Center to discuss her desire to build reasonably priced small single floor housing for those age 55 and over, near The Center on Ice House Road’s lot 3 and the Hinkley field land, to take advantage of the synergies that would be available from adjoining The Center.  We also discussed how housing for that age group has been talked about for the Medfield State Hospital site redevelopment, and that the Medfield State Hospital Master Planning Committee member (and housing developer), Ralph Costello, described at our Tuesday selectmen meeting when discussing that sort of housing that one gets to different price points by adjusting the density.  This concept also got me really excited for the possibilities.

Data on seniors

The Massachusetts Healthy Aging Data Report provides interesting data and especially maps of the data on senior citizens in Massachusetts.

Medfield’s data.

STATE MAPS

Medfield’s biggest variant from state numbers was about our low crime rates –


SAFETY                                               Medfield  State
Violent crime rate / 100,000 persons      58        428
Property crime rate / 100,000 persons  471     2,259