Category Archives: Children

Volunteer for 12/4 Holiday Stroll 4-9pm

From the Cultural Alliance of Medfield –


The Cultural Alliance of Medfield is seeking December 4th Holiday Art and Craft Stroll Volunteers. Please click on link to sign up:

The First Annual Holiday Stroll takes place on Friday December 4th, from 4-9 pm, with over 25 artists booths in three locations; the Zullo Gallery, Medfield Library, and the United Church of Christ (UCC).

We need volunteers to help in 2 hour shifts to greet and direct visitors to artists booths, and event locations going on in town that evening.

The Baxter Park Holiday tree lighting takes place at 6:30, and Brothers Marketplace, the Library, and Park Street Books will all be hosting FREE family events. There will be caroling, hot cocoa, an ice sculptor and photos with Santa at The Dwight Derby House.

Visit for complete details about this very special holiday event, and thanks for helping to promote art and culture in Medfield.

Angel Run registration closes Halloween

Angel Run

Dear Friends of the MFi Angel Run,

The frost isn’t on the pumpkin yet but the wings are on the angel!

Time is flying so register now for early bird pricing and the famous Angel Run t-shirt for the 2015 MFi Angel Run.

Regstration is exclusively online at through Oct. 31st. After that date, you can only register on race day and t-shirts will not be available. Don’t miss out! Do your first good deed of the coming holiday season by signing up today. Proceeds from the MFi Angel Run stay right here in our community to help Medfield residents in need.


Angel Run keepsake

In honor of the 10th anniversary of the Angel Run you can purchase during registration a special Angel Run keepsake.
“Give Where You Live” and sign up at

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter @MedfieldFndn for updates on the run/walk, training tips and more opportunities to be involved in this great community event. This year features bib chip timing and as always, all paces, including strollers and leashed dogs are welcome.

Join us on Sunday, December 6th at 2pm with bells on!

With appreciation,

Your MFi Angel Run Team


Liz Loveless leaving

Liz Loveless, Youth Outreach Worker at Medfield Youth Outreach, announced today that she will be moving to Needham Youth Services this month – a copy of her email appears below.  This is a big loss for Medfield Youth Outreach, MCAP, and the kids in town.


7/08/2014 2:38PM
News from MYO
Medfield Youth-Outreach
Hi everyone,

I am writing this note to let you all know that I will be leaving my position as Youth Outreach Worker at Medfield Youth Outreach. I have decided to take a child therapist job at Needham Youth Services where I have been doing some part time work over the past few years. My last day here at MYO will be July 18th.

I have enjoyed serving the wonderful Medfield community and working closely with school staff, needs based organizations, town departments, and of course, Medfield children and families. It has been a pleasure to work with you and I wish you all the best!



Medfield Youth Outreach
459 Main St.
Medfield, MA 02052

MYO brochure

One of Medfield’s treasures is the Medfield Youth Outreach, which does things both wonderful and and large, for a two person department.  After the Board of Selectmen meeting last night I picked up the new MYO brochure at the Town House.

Dealing with children about trauma

Good advice in two articles from our local community mental health agency and my former entity, Riverside Community Care, as circulated this morning by Blake Middle School –


Riverside Trauma Center 255 Highland Avenue, Needham, MA 02494 (Tel) 781-433-0672
24 hour trauma response line: 888-851-2451 (this is not a suicide prevention hotline)
Rev: 3/11
Riverside Trauma Center


Children respond to traumatic violence in a variety of ways; however there are several typical responses. These responses vary, depending on numerous factors, some of which are: the child‟s age, whether the child knew the individuals involved, and how „graphic‟ the violence was.  Some common responses to trauma include:
 Concerns about fearing that the person (people) suffered
 Repeatedly visualizing the crime/incident in their minds
 Constant attempts to tell and retell the story of the crime/incident
 Need to reenact the crime/incident through play
 A desire to seek revenge (for those who knew the victim(s))
 Feelings of guilt for not having intervened or prevented the crime

For some children, particularly those who knew the victim(s), signals of grief after a violent crime/incident include:
 Fear of death
 Fear of being left alone or sleeping alone
 A need to be with people who have been through the same experience
 Difficulty concentrating
 Drop in grades (during the school year)
 Physical complaints (headaches/stomachaches)
 Bed-wetting
 Nightmares
 Fear of sleep
 Clingy behavior (wanting to be with and around parents more often)

What you can do to help children who have witnessed violence:
 Allow your child to talk about what he/she experienced or heard about
 Know that younger children may prefer to “draw” about their experiences
 Ask them what they saw and heard and what they think about the experience. Help them to label feelings, and normalize their reactions (“that must have been pretty scary. It wouldn‟t surprise me if you keep thinking about it.”)
 Spend some extra time with your child: have dinner together, make sure to keep bedtime routines.
 Remind your child of things he/she likes to do to help feel better when upset (playing, reading, etc.).
 Keep routines as much the same as possible in the aftermath of an unpleasant event. Children count on routines and structure.

If you have concerns that your child may be having serious responses to trauma, you should speak to a counselor.

24 hour Critical Incident Line: 888-851-2451



Talking with your Children About Traumatic Events

Here are some tips for talking with your children when they have witnessed or heard about traumatic events:

Listen to your children: Ask what have they heard about the traumatic event. What do they think happened? Let them tell you in their own words and answer their questions. Don’t assume you know what they are feeling or what their questions will be. The easiest way to have this conversation might be while they are engaged in an activity: drawing, sitting on a swing, or driving with you in the car. Details that may be obvious to adults may not be to children. For example a child may see a school shooting on television and assume it happened in his or her neighborhood not hundreds of miles away. Be truthful but don’t tell them more information than they can handle for their age.

Focus on their safety: Once you understand their perception of the traumatic event, be clear that you will keep them safe and let them know adults (school, police, etc.) are working hard to make sure they will stay safe. School age children may be assured to know the shooter or persons responsible for this tragedy are dead or have been arrested and do not present a danger to your child or his or her school.

Pay attention to your reactions: Your children will be watching you carefully and taking their cues from you. If you can manage your anxiety about the traumatic event your children will be more easily reassured.

Monitor your child’s access to media: It will help if young children do not watch news reports or see the front page of the newspaper. Young children who watch a traumatic event on the TV news may think the event is still ongoing or happening again.

Watch for behavior changes: Your children may show you through their behavior they are still struggling with what they have heard or seen. They may have physical complaints or regressive behaviors often including nightmares, insomnia or bed wetting. They may feel guilty that they are responsible for the event, and need to be reassured that they are not responsible.

Maintain your routines: Sticking to your daily structure of activities: mealtimes, bedtime rituals, etc. reduces anxiety and helps children feel more in control.

Keep the door open: Encourage your children to come to you with any questions or concerns and do not assume the questions will stop after a few days or even a few weeks. Let them know their fears and questions are normal and you will always make time for them.  Remind them all questions are welcome.

Consider this a teachable moment: For older children this traumatic event may lead to a discussion about ways they can help others who have experienced a tragedy. You can also ask them if they know how to keep themselves safe when they are away from home. Traumatic events make us feel like we have lost control so any constructive activities we engage in make us feel less vulnerable.

Medical marijuana

The Board of Selectmen got (1) a letter from the Walpole selectmen asking us to support their request to the legislature to delay implementation of the medical marijuana statute, and (2) resident Joe Cavanaugh’s suggestion for a zoning change to control where the marijuana “clinics”  can be located in town, along with copies of bylaws enacted in two other towns.

The Walpole delay is to be able to plan for implementation, and to enact regulations and make plans on how to deal with the whole new enterprise.  The zoning changes would be to set out where the stores can be located.

I think Massachusetts missed a huge opportunity to get tax monies from marijuana, as the ballot initiative positions our marijuana “clinics” as non-profits, from which the state will get no revenue at all, but the state will still incur a lot in costs to regulate and police this new business.

And I continue to be concerned for what is apparently the detrimental effects of the marijuana use on our kids, which use will certainly go up once there are the stores around.

Community Reads Day at Memorial School

Thank you to all at the Memorial School for inviting me to read to the children this morning, as part of their celebration of Read Across America (for the birthday of Dr. Seuss last week).  I got to read Marc Brown’s DW the Picky Eater to preschoolers.  My daughter Kristen picked out my book for me.  Good fun event.