NFL legal news


This today from my American Association for Justice update.  Interestingly the real problem, CTE is not covered, because it can only be diagnosed after death. That analysis may generate a new field, post-mortem litigation planning, to follow the already existing legal area of post-mortem estate planning.  Soon our after lives will be so scheduled that we will be marveling at how we ever had time to get things done while we were alive. –

AAJ-2

Supreme Court declines to review settlement between NFL and retired players.

USA Today (12/12, Perez, 5.28M) reports the Supreme Court declined to review a settlement reached between the NFL and retired NFL players, which will “allow payments to be made to those covered in a deal first reached more than three years ago.” Under the settlement, the “NFL agreed to cover more than 20,000 retired players at a cost that could surpass $1 billion in a reworked settlement approved by a federal judge in April 2015.”

The AP (12/12, Golen) reports Christopher Seeger, one of the attorneys representing the retired NFL players, said, “This decision means that, finally, retired NFL players will receive much-needed care and support for the serious neurocognitive injuries they are facing.” Under the settlement, players suffering from some neurological conditions are eligible to receive millions of dollars, but the average payment for the players is expected to be around $190,000.

Reuters (12/12, Hurley) reports some have criticized the settlement for not awarding payments to players suffering from CTE, which has been linked to concussions.

The New York Daily News (12/12, Red, 4.45M) reports the class-action lawsuit that preceded the settlement claimed the NFL covered up its knowledge of the long-term dangers “caused by football-related head injuries.”

Additional coverage is provided by: the Los Angeles Times (12/12, Fenno, 4.52M), NPR (12/12, Hersher, 1.92M), and the Washington Examiner (12/12, Weaver, 400K).

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