Summary of the study measuring the economic impact of the arts and cultural organizations in Medfield

~.--Arts&Economic Prosperity®S A Project of Americans for the Arts The Economic Impact of Nonprofit Arts and Cultural Organizations and Their Audiences in the Town of Medfield, MA (Fiscal Year 2015) Arts and Cultural Direct Economic Activity ~ Total Industry Expenditures $2,748,727 + Arts and Cultural Audiences $382,700 Economic Impact of Spending by Arts and Cultural Organizations and Their Audiences Total Economic Impact of Expenditures Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Jobs Supported Household Income Paid to Residents Revenue Generated to Local Government Revenue Generated to State Government Economic Impact of ~ 118 $1,944,000 $98,000 $86,000 + Economic Impact of Audiences 7 $143,000 $15,000 $25,000 = = Total Industry Expenditures $3,131,427 Total Economic Impact 125 $2,087,000 $113,000 $111,000 Event-Related Spending by Arts and Cultural Audiences Totaled $382,700 (gcluding the cost of admission) Attendance to Arts and Culture Events Total Attendance to Arts and Culture Events Percentage of Total Attendance Average Event-Related Spending Per Person Total Event-Related Expenditures Resident' Attendees 28,703 92.6% $12.02 $345,010 + Nonresident' Attendees 2,294 7.4% $16.43 $37,690 = All Cultural Audiences 30,997 100.0% $12.35 $382,700 Nonprofit Arts and Cultural Event Attendees Spend an Average of $12.35 Per Person (£!eluding the cost of admission) Category of Event-Related Expenditure Meals and Refreshments Souvenirs and Gifts Ground Transportation Overnight Lodging (one night only) Other/Miscellaneous Average Event-Related Spending Per Person Resident' Attendees $8.07 $2.06 $0.27 $0.01 $1.61 $12.02 Nonresident' Attendees $8.73 $3.41 $0.24 $2.56 $1.49 $16.43 All Cultural Audiences I $8.12 $2.16 $0.27 $0.20 $1.60 $12.35 Source: Arts & Economic Prosperity 5: The Economic Impact of Nonprofit Arts and Cultural Organizations and Their Audiences in the Town of Medfield. For more information about this study or about other cultural initiatives in the Town of Medfield, visit the Cultural Alliance of Medfield's web site at www.medfieldculture.org/medfield-cultural-council. Copyright 2017 by Americans for the Arts (www.AmericansForTheArts.org). About This Study This Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 study was conducted by Americans for the Arts to document the economic impact of the nonprofit arts and culture industry in 341 communities and regions (113 cities, 115 counties, 81 multicity or multicounty regions, 10 states, and 12 individual arts districts)-representing all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. The diverse communities range in population (1,500 to more than 4 million) and type (small rural to large urban). Project economists from the Georgia Institute of Technology customized an input-output analysis model for each participating region to provide specific and localized data on four measures of economic impact: full-time equivalent jobs, household income, and local and state government revenue. These localized models allow for the uniqueness of each local economy to be reflected in the findings. Americans for the Arts partnered with 250 local, regional, and statewide organizations that represent the 341 study regions (30 partners included multiple study regions as part of their participation). To complete this customized analysis for the Town of Medfield, the Cultural Alliance of Medfield joined the study as one of the 250 partners. Surveys of Nonprofit Arts and Cultural ORGANIZATIONS Each of the 250 partner organizations identified the universe of nonprofit arts and cultural organizations that are located in its region(s) using the Urban Institute's National Taxonomy of Exempt Entity (NTEE) coding system, a definitive classification system for nonprofit organizations recognized as tax exempt by the Internal Revenue Code. In addition, the study partners were encouraged to include other types of eligible organizations if they play a substantial role in the cultural life of the community or iftheir primary purpose is to promote participation in, appreciation for, and understanding of the visual, performing, folk, and literary and media arts. These include government-owned or government-operated cultural facilities and institutions; municipal arts agencies and councils; private community arts organizations; unincorporated arts groups; living collections (such as zoos, aquariums, and botanical gardens); university presenters, programs, and facilities; and arts programs that are embedded under the umbrella of a nonarts organization or facility (such as a hospital or church). In short, if it displays the characteristics of a nonprofit arts and cultural organization, it is included. For-profit businesses (e.g., Broadway, motion picture theaters) and individual artists were excluded from this study. Nationally, data was collected from a total of 14,439 organizations for this study. Response rates among all eligible organizations located in the 341 study regions was 54.0 percent, and ranged from 9.5 percent to 100 percent. Responding organizations had budgets ranging from $0 to $785 million (Smithsonian Institution). It is important to note that each study region's results are based solely on the actual survey data collected. There are no estimates made to account for nonresponding organizations. Therefore, the less-than-100 percent response rates suggest an understatement of the economic impact findings in most of the individual study regions. In the Town of Medfield, 17 of the 17 eligible nonprofit arts and cultural organizations participated in this study-an overall participation rate of 100.0 percent. A list of the participating organizations can be obtained from the Cultural Alliance of Medfield. Surveys of Nonprofit Arts and Cultural AUDIENCES Audience-intercept surveying, a common and accepted research method, was completed in all 341 study regions to capture information about spending by audiences at nonprofit arts and culture events. Patrons were selected randomly and asked to complete a short survey while attending an event. A total of212,691 attendees completed the survey. The respondents provided itemized travel party expenditure data on attendance-related activities such as meals, souvenirs, transportation, and lodging. Data was collected throughout the year to guard against seasonal spikes or drop-offs in attendance, and at a broad range of events (because a night at the opera will typically yield more spending than a Saturday children's theater production). Using total attendance data for 2015 (collected from the participating organizations), standard statistical methods were then used to derive a reliable estimate of total arts event-related expenditures by attendees in each study region. In the Town of Medfield, a total of 527 valid audience-intercept surveys were collected from attendees to nonprofit arts and cultural performances, events, and exhibitions during 2016. Studying Economic Impact Using Input-Output Analysis To derive the most reliable economic impact data, input-output analysis was used to measure the impact of expenditures by nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and their audiences. This highly-regarded type of economic analysis has been the basis for two Nobel Prizes in economics. The models are systems of mathematical equations that combine statistical methods and economic theory in an area of study called econometrics. The analysis traces how many times a dollar is respent within the local economy before it leaves the community, and it quantifies the economic impact of each of those rounds of spending. Project economists customized an input-output model for each of the 341 participating study regions based on the local dollar flow among 533 finely detailed industries within its economy. This was accomplished by using detailed data on employment, incomes, and government revenues provided by the U.S. Department of Commerce (County Business Patterns, the Regional Economic Information System, and the Survey of State and Local Finance), state and local tax data (e.g., sales taxes, lodging tax, property taxes, income tax, and miscellaneous local option taxes), and the survey data collected from the responding arts and cultural organizations and their audiences. 1 For the purpose of this study, residents are attendees who live within Norfolk County; nonresidents live elsewhere. A comprehensive description of the methodology used to complete the national study is available at www.AmericansForTheArts.org/Economiclmpact.20170620-Economic Impact of Nonprofit Arts_Page_2

Culture and the arts are economic drivers

Jean Mineo both arranged for the town to participate in a study of the economics of arts in our community, attended a conference on the topic, and presented the results to the Select Board at our last meeting.  The economic data was generated by seventeen Town of Medfield arts organizations separately inputting their data into the study.

In sum, the arts and cultural industry (defined as the organizations and their audiences combined) spend $3.1m per year in town, and support 125 jobs in town.

ARTS study-2017

Per the study –

The Town of Medfield’s Participating Nonprofit Arts and Cultural Organizations

This study could not have been completed without the cooperation of the 17 nonprofit arts and cultural organizations in the Town of Medfield, listed below, that provided detailed financial and event attendance information about their organization.

Cultural Alliance Of Medfield; First Parish Unitarian Universalist Church; Friends of the Dwight-Derby House; Gazebo Players of Medfield; Lowell Mason House Inc; Medfield Community Cable Access Corp; Medfield Cultural Council; Medfield Employers and Merchants Organization; Medfield Garden Club; Medfield High School Theater Society; Medfield Historical Society; Medfield Music Association; Medfield Public Library; Norfolk Hunt Club; United Church Of Christ; Vine Lake Preservation Trust; and Zullo Gallery Center for the Arts.

Paul Curran Square

This morning the Paul Curran Square was dedicated at the intersection of Emerson and Flintlock, by the Committee to Study Memorials.

Mr. Curran lived there from 1962 to his death in 1994. He was a WWII vet who participated in D’Day, and was the town veteran service officer for decades. He was also on the Memorial Day committee, the Committee to Study Memorials, and was active in the Legion.

Speakers included current VSO, Ron Griffin, shown addressing the crowd in the rain.

Chief Kingsbury retirement

Bill Kingsbury and his firefighters at the retirement reception honoring the Chief last night. Forty-five years of service to the town. Remarkable. And a remarkable man.
[Emd]

Best,
Pete
Osler L. Peterson, attorney at Law
PETERSON | Law
580 Washington Street
Newton, MA 02458-1416
T. 617.969.1500
F.. 617.663.6088
M. 508.359.9190
Direct 617.969.1501

66 North Street, PO Box 358
Medfield, MA 02052-0358

Osler.Peterson@OslerPeterson.com

Sent from my phone, so please excuse typos.

We are at 7.2% affordable housing

The Department of Housing and Community Development provided this chart of our current SHI with its notice that we are in a safe harbor, which shows that we have 7.2% affordable housing now per the Department of Housing and Community Development tally.  We have a total of 304 SHI with the two 40B projects that are being built, and we need a  total of 422 to be at the 10% threshold.  However, the new decennial census in 2020 will up our total number of dwelling units above the 4,220 that Department of Housing and Community Development is using below from the 2010 census, and hence that will increase the 10% needed to be in safe harbor too, so we will need more that just another 118 SHI to be in safe harbor after 2020.

SHI-20170620

Certified in safe harbor

40b

Letter today, dated yesterday, from Department of Housing and Community Development certified that the Town of Medfield is in a safe harbor due to our having both a certified Housing Production Plan and 21 Subsidized Housing Inventory (SHI) eligible units that have been approved.

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This Certification of Municipal Compliance is based on the following findings:

  1. Medfield has provided evidence that the required number of units described in its request is eligible to be counted towards certification.
  2. The 21 Subsidized Housing Inventory (SHI) eligible units in these projects (Country Estates SHI ID# 10062) and (67 North Street SHI ID# (10063) meet the number necessary to satisfy a one year certification threshold.
  3. The housing development is consistent with the production goals outlined in Medfield Housing Production
    Plan.

Send a Medfield child to camp

From the Medfield Foundation, Inc.

kids

Attention Medfield Residents!

Help send a child in need to camp this summer.

This is an especially difficult time of year for some local families who want to send their kids to camp but simply can’t.

MFi is launching a special fundraising effort to help send kids to camp and/or purchase family passes to Hinkley Pond for local families in need.

A small donation now can make a big difference in the lives of these kids. Our goal is 200 families donating $50 each. Your generosity and support are much appreciated. Can we count on you to help?

Donate Now!

https://www.networkforgood.org/donati…/ExpressDonation.aspx…